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Wednesday, November 18
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Wednesday November 18, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
BC Ballroom

8:30am

9:45am

Web accessibility and Universal Design for Learning in OERs: Lessons learned from three projects
This special session takes an in-depth look at the accessibility efforts of BCcampus, CAST, and the FLOE Project as they relate to open educational resources.

1. User Testing Open Textbooks with Students with Print Disabilities

BCcampus will briefly describe the process of user testing open textbooks with post-secondary students who have print disabilities. The focus will be on the lessons learned in this process and how this data fed into the creation of a toolkit on accessibility for open textbook authors. Presenters will share failures and reflect on how to improve this process in the future. The presentation will showcase the BC Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit and share best practices with the audience on how to make all open educational resources accessible, therefore making the materials truly open to all.

2. CAST projects

Project Open (https://open4us.org) is an initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to help TAACCCT grantees meet OER, accessibility, and quality requirements for grant deliverables in the U.S. Department of Labor's two billion dollar Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College & Career Training (TAACCCT) program. We will describe the process of working with community and technical colleges to develop Open Educational Resources that follow universal design for learning (UDL) guidelines and web accessibility standards. We will focus on what we have learned about how to support UDL implementation and web accessibility best practices from our engagement with colleges through the largest OER initiative to date (the Department of Labor's TAACCCT program). We will showcase udloncampus.cast.org a set of web resources we have developed to help postsecondary stakeholders integrate Universal Design for Learning into the development of course materials, teaching methods and assessments and discuss how OER creators can move from addressing web accessibility to designing for all students through UDL.

The Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) Center (http://aem.cast.org/) has a mandate to provide technical assistance resources designed to increase the availability and use of curriculum resources and delivery systems designed accessible from the outset, including elementary, secondary, postsecondary and workforce-related OER. We will review best practices in OER creation with an emphasis on EPUB3; the emerging importance of equipping OERs with the capacity for data interoperability related to student usage, and we will emphasize the important role of accessibility as foundational component in the creation of UDL-aligned OER.

3. FLOE project

The FLOE Project (http://floeproject.org) leverages the diverse pool of Open Education Resources (OER) and the opportunity to create variants to optimize learning for the full diversity of learners. FLOE supports learners in discovering and refining their understanding of how they learn best, specifying this, and then the FLOE services can be used to match those needs for a given learning goal.

Presenters
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus
SJ

Sam Johnston

Research Scientist, CAST
Sam Johnston brings expertise in peer-based learning models, distance and blended education, and program evaluation to her work at CAST. With support of the Gates Foundation’s Open Professionals Education Network, she recently led the development of UDL On Campus (udloncampus.cast.org)--a collection of online resources to aid postsecondary educators in implementing UDL. | Her primary research focus is on the use of networked technology to... Read More →
avatar for Jutta Treviranus

Jutta Treviranus

Director, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC), professor and director of an innovative graduate program in inclusive design at OCAD University Toronto.(http://idrc.ocadu.ca, http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/inclusive_design.htm). The IDRC is an international center of expertise in digital inclusion. Jutta also heads the Inclusive Design Institute a multi-university regional research centre on... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Vancouver Island

9:45am

Introductory Psychology Textbooks: The Roles of Online vs. Print and Open vs. Traditional Textbooks
We used surveys and course performance outcomes to examine the roles of online vs. print and open vs. traditional textbooks in 8 sections of Introductory Psychology courses.

Presenters
avatar for Farhad Dastur

Farhad Dastur

Faculty Member, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I believe that open education is one of the most important and exciting developments in higher education. I have taught using open textbooks; I have consulted on a Research Methods course using an open development platform (WikiEducator); I am co-creating an Intro Psychology course for OERu; I have conducted research on the efficacy of open textbooks; and I am writing an open textbook on Critical Thinking.
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am the Open Studies Teaching Fellow and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. I have revised two open textbooks—for... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
BC Ballroom

9:45am

Expanding the Z-Degree: Post-Pilot
After 4 semesters and over 2,500 students, Tidewater Community College's Z- Degree is no longer in pilot mode. In this session, college leadership and project contributors will share plans for the expansion of the Z- Degree project and the challenges and opportunities of scaling the Z Degree across a large, multi-campus institution. Highlights of topics covered are recruitment and training of new Z- Degree faculty, identification of opportunities within curriculums for OER adoption as well as the role of librarians and instructional designers in faculty professional development.

Presenters
DD

Daniel DeMarte

Vice President for Academic Affairs & CAO, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Waddington Room

9:45am

You created an open textbook in 4 days?!?!?!
Code sprints are a popular method of collaborative software development in the open source software world. During a code sprint, a group of programmers gather together for a short term, intensive and tightly focused programming session to create collaborative software projects.

Modeled after these collaborative code sprints from the open source software development world, a book sprint is an intensive content creation retreat that aims to build an open textbook from start to finish in less than a week.

In June of 2014, 5 Geography faculty from 4 post-secondary institutions in British Columbia converged at UBC to create a first year regional Geography textbook in just 4 days. Supported by a librarian, instructional designer, illustrator, programmer, and a Book Sprint facilitator, we ended the four day book sprint with an open textbook created completely from scratch.

In this session, we'll explore this unique model of OER content creation with three participants who were involved in the project. This session will address the benefits and challenges involved with this unique method of collaborative OER creation, what we learned about open education and collaboration, and the practicalities of organizing and executing a successful book sprint.

Presenters
avatar for Arthur Gill Green

Arthur Gill Green

Professor, UBC
I work on property rights, GIScience, and Open Pedagogy. Three very different areas that have come to be symbiotic in my research and work. Would love to talk to fans of QGIS, people working on property rights, or people attempting to integrate open pedagogical practices in their work.
avatar for Clint Lalonde

Clint Lalonde

Manager, Educational Technology, BCcampus
Clint Lalonde is an educational technologist and an advocate for the use of open educational resources and open education practices in higher education. Clint has worked in the British Columbia post-secondary system for 20 years, and is currently Manager, Education Technology at BCcampus.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Boardroom

10:15am

Web accessibility and Universal Design for Learning in OERs: Lessons learned from three projects
This special session takes an in-depth look at the accessibility efforts of BCcampus, CAST, and the FLOE Project as they relate to open educational resources.

1. User Testing Open Textbooks with Students with Print Disabilities

BCcampus will briefly describe the process of user testing open textbooks with post-secondary students who have print disabilities. The focus will be on the lessons learned in this process and how this data fed into the creation of a toolkit on accessibility for open textbook authors. Presenters will share failures and reflect on how to improve this process in the future. The presentation will showcase the BC Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit and share best practices with the audience on how to make all open educational resources accessible, therefore making the materials truly open to all.

2. CAST projects

Project Open (https://open4us.org) is an initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to help TAACCCT grantees meet OER, accessibility, and quality requirements for grant deliverables in the U.S. Department of Labor's two billion dollar Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College & Career Training (TAACCCT) program. We will describe the process of working with community and technical colleges to develop Open Educational Resources that follow universal design for learning (UDL) guidelines and web accessibility standards. We will focus on what we have learned about how to support UDL implementation and web accessibility best practices from our engagement with colleges through the largest OER initiative to date (the Department of Labor's TAACCCT program). We will showcase udloncampus.cast.org a set of web resources we have developed to help postsecondary stakeholders integrate Universal Design for Learning into the development of course materials, teaching methods and assessments and discuss how OER creators can move from addressing web accessibility to designing for all students through UDL.

The Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) Center (http://aem.cast.org/) has a mandate to provide technical assistance resources designed to increase the availability and use of curriculum resources and delivery systems designed accessible from the outset, including elementary, secondary, postsecondary and workforce-related OER. We will review best practices in OER creation with an emphasis on EPUB3; the emerging importance of equipping OERs with the capacity for data interoperability related to student usage, and we will emphasize the important role of accessibility as foundational component in the creation of UDL-aligned OER.

3. FLOE project

The FLOE Project (http://floeproject.org) leverages the diverse pool of Open Education Resources (OER) and the opportunity to create variants to optimize learning for the full diversity of learners. FLOE supports learners in discovering and refining their understanding of how they learn best, specifying this, and then the FLOE services can be used to match those needs for a given learning goal.

Presenters
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus
SJ

Sam Johnston

Research Scientist, CAST
Sam Johnston brings expertise in peer-based learning models, distance and blended education, and program evaluation to her work at CAST. With support of the Gates Foundation’s Open Professionals Education Network, she recently led the development of UDL On Campus (udloncampus.cast.org)--a collection of online resources to aid postsecondary educators in implementing UDL. | Her primary research focus is on the use of networked technology to... Read More →
avatar for Jutta Treviranus

Jutta Treviranus

Director, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC), professor and director of an innovative graduate program in inclusive design at OCAD University Toronto.(http://idrc.ocadu.ca, http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/inclusive_design.htm). The IDRC is an international center of expertise in digital inclusion. Jutta also heads the Inclusive Design Institute a multi-university regional research centre on... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Vancouver Island

10:15am

Quantitative Evaluation of OER Textbook Quality
Research on efficacy of OER has focused on the presence or absence of OER without regard to the quality of the OER employed. Data regarding expert evaluations of higher ed OER textbooks will be presented as well as recommendations for such evaluations to be used as important covariates in efficacy research.

Presenters
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, Counseling Psychology & Special Ed, BYU
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
BC Ballroom

10:15am

Expanding the Z-Degree: Post-Pilot
After 4 semesters and over 2,500 students, Tidewater Community College's Z- Degree is no longer in pilot mode. In this session, college leadership and project contributors will share plans for the expansion of the Z- Degree project and the challenges and opportunities of scaling the Z Degree across a large, multi-campus institution. Highlights of topics covered are recruitment and training of new Z- Degree faculty, identification of opportunities within curriculums for OER adoption as well as the role of librarians and instructional designers in faculty professional development.

Presenters
DD

Daniel DeMarte

Vice President for Academic Affairs & CAO, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Waddington Room

10:15am

Why Open Education Demands Open Analytic Models
It has been recognized by many leaders in the open education community that the rise of adaptive, personalized and otherwise data-driven approaches to leveraging digital learning content have profound implications for OER. If open educational resources continue to be focused on the development of relatively static, textbook-like materials that are unable to engage with data-driven feedback loops, then the materials developed by closed approaches will rapidly outpace OER with regard to effectiveness and impact. This state of affairs will likely result in OER being relegated to second-class status, used by disadvantaged learners who cannot afford high-tech, data-driven courseware.

Ensuring that OER can continue to support effective, data-driven learning experiences will require progress on a number of fronts with regard to the open infrastructure – open materials that can generate actionable data in relation to learner achievement and knowledge state; open systems to serve these materials and capture necessary information about learner interactions; open data services, equipped to consume data streams from interactions with open courseware and return processed information regarding knowledge state, achievement, progression and engagement, among other components. While some significant elements of this ecosystem are missing, the open community continues to make progress in building out components of open analytics systems. Unfortunately, too often the 'open' of these systems is synonymous with open source software - open code that can consume and analyze data feeds - without exploring the implications of the underlying models and algorithms that process the data and return interpretable information about the learners, their outcome achievements, risks, progress and attainment. While the openness of the supporting systems and course materials is important, over the longer term ensuring that the underlying analytic methods, models and algorithms are open is essential. The mechanisms of these underlying cognitive models, predictive algorithms and inference engines are the key factor in determining the usefulness and effectiveness of these larger systems; these components have an outsized impact on learners and on long term changes to materials and programs.

This session will argue for the importance of open analytic models to the open education community. Key questions to be explored include: What constitutes open models, and how can these be contrasted with characteristics of closed, proprietary approaches? Why are open models necessary for systems that will increasingly guide learner instruction and progression? How do open models for learning analytics relate to the underlying philosophies of open education and science? What improvements and affordances are provided by an insistence on open analytic models? And finally, what are some examples of demonstrated dangers caused by reliance on closed models?

Presenters
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Boardroom

10:45am

Break
Coffee & tea provided

Wednesday November 18, 2015 10:45am - 11:00am
On Your Own

11:00am

Web accessibility and Universal Design for Learning in OERs: Lessons learned from three projects
This special session takes an in-depth look at the accessibility efforts of BCcampus, CAST, and the FLOE Project as they relate to open educational resources.

1. User Testing Open Textbooks with Students with Print Disabilities

BCcampus will briefly describe the process of user testing open textbooks with post-secondary students who have print disabilities. The focus will be on the lessons learned in this process and how this data fed into the creation of a toolkit on accessibility for open textbook authors. Presenters will share failures and reflect on how to improve this process in the future. The presentation will showcase the BC Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit and share best practices with the audience on how to make all open educational resources accessible, therefore making the materials truly open to all.

2. CAST projects

Project Open (https://open4us.org) is an initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to help TAACCCT grantees meet OER, accessibility, and quality requirements for grant deliverables in the U.S. Department of Labor's two billion dollar Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College & Career Training (TAACCCT) program. We will describe the process of working with community and technical colleges to develop Open Educational Resources that follow universal design for learning (UDL) guidelines and web accessibility standards. We will focus on what we have learned about how to support UDL implementation and web accessibility best practices from our engagement with colleges through the largest OER initiative to date (the Department of Labor's TAACCCT program). We will showcase udloncampus.cast.org a set of web resources we have developed to help postsecondary stakeholders integrate Universal Design for Learning into the development of course materials, teaching methods and assessments and discuss how OER creators can move from addressing web accessibility to designing for all students through UDL.

The Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) Center (http://aem.cast.org/) has a mandate to provide technical assistance resources designed to increase the availability and use of curriculum resources and delivery systems designed accessible from the outset, including elementary, secondary, postsecondary and workforce-related OER. We will review best practices in OER creation with an emphasis on EPUB3; the emerging importance of equipping OERs with the capacity for data interoperability related to student usage, and we will emphasize the important role of accessibility as foundational component in the creation of UDL-aligned OER.

3. FLOE project

The FLOE Project (http://floeproject.org) leverages the diverse pool of Open Education Resources (OER) and the opportunity to create variants to optimize learning for the full diversity of learners. FLOE supports learners in discovering and refining their understanding of how they learn best, specifying this, and then the FLOE services can be used to match those needs for a given learning goal.

Presenters
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus
SJ

Sam Johnston

Research Scientist, CAST
Sam Johnston brings expertise in peer-based learning models, distance and blended education, and program evaluation to her work at CAST. With support of the Gates Foundation’s Open Professionals Education Network, she recently led the development of UDL On Campus (udloncampus.cast.org)--a collection of online resources to aid postsecondary educators in implementing UDL. | Her primary research focus is on the use of networked technology to... Read More →
avatar for Jutta Treviranus

Jutta Treviranus

Director, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC), professor and director of an innovative graduate program in inclusive design at OCAD University Toronto.(http://idrc.ocadu.ca, http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/inclusive_design.htm). The IDRC is an international center of expertise in digital inclusion. Jutta also heads the Inclusive Design Institute a multi-university regional research centre on... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Vancouver Island

11:00am

The entire package: OER research, implementation, success
How do you fit all of your OER tools together to drive use and student success? This presentation will walk you through the most recent OER research, effective institutional OER models, and the University of System of Georgia's recent large-scale efforts to adopt OER. Hear how others have planned and initiated OER programs as well as get ideas on driving large scale use of OER at your institution. Presenters include: John Hilton III of the Open Education Group at Brigham Young University, Nicole Finkbeiner of Rice University's OpenStax College, and Lauren Fancher of Affordable Learning Georgia / University System of Georgia.

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, Rice University's OpenStax
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations for community colleges prior to joining OpenStax College. When not promoting Open Education Resources, Nicole fills her time attending lectures, spending time... Read More →
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
BC Ballroom

11:00am

Yay! We found the perfect open textbook...Now what?
A number of large-scale open textbook projects have been under way for several years, with some textbooks now completed and adopted for use in educational settings. While these projects typically are initiated with sufficient energy, funding and infrastructure to develop high quality products, when the dust settles questions begin to arise as to how they are to be implemented as well as maintained over time in the complex world of higher education. While the traditional commercial textbook model – whether digital or not – presents challenges, there are certain knowns including purchasing, implementation and versioning cycles that sustain the textbooks over the long term, but of course at a cost to students who must pay premium prices and to faculty who lose the flexibility and control achieved with open textbooks.

When open textbooks enter the same ecosystem, there are many unknowns that need to be confronted. Drawing upon their observations, discussions with stakeholders and feedback received through the various stages of implementation, the presenters describe and analyze their recent experience with the multi-purpose incorporation of an open textbook. Adopted from the BCcampus Open Textbook initiative, the textbook was implemented both for a second year online university psychology course and for a parallel Open Education Resource universitas (OERu) open course. The presenters share their observations and findings gathered over the implementation cycle to identify issues, challenges and emerging possibilities for the long-term success of open textbooks in higher education.

Presenters
avatar for Irwin DeVries

Irwin DeVries

Interim Associate Vice-President, Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning
TRU


Wednesday November 18, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Waddington Room

11:00am

A Path to Open Learning Data?
As the recently published Asilomar Convention argues, the sharing of learning data is an essential element in maximizing the benefits of learning research; this call for open data as a public good is exceptionally well-aligned with the underlying philosophical foundations and practices of the open education community. This alignment suggests what should be a close relationship between open education and the open data & science communities—in theory, learner interactions with OER could produce Open Learning Data that would drive Open Scientific advances, in turn informing the future generations of educational resources.

In practice, however, the opening of learning data has proven more elusive, such that we continue to lack clear definitions and practices around Open Learning Data. Approaches that have served Open Data well in general have proven less useful in the educational data context, due to a combination of legitimate concerns for appropriately protecting learners, an excess of caution around the risks of opening learning data sets, and a regulator inheritance that is not always well suited to educational research. While some earlier attempts have been made to resolve these tensions, these attempts often rely on anonymizing approaches that can dramatically limit the utility of the data for scientists.

This working session will seek to begin the work of producing clearer and more useful definitions and practices around Open Learning Data, with an emphasis on the potential special relationship between the open education movement and the data that OER can produce. The session will begin with a very brief overview of the promises and challenges of open learning data, highlighting some current practices in the space. The majority of the session will be devoted to a discussion of Open Learning Data, ideally generating some draft definitions and approaches that can serve as foundational elements for continuing work beyond OpenEd 2015.

Key guiding questions for the discussion include: How do we define Open Learning Data? What constraints around access and use can be put in place while still ensuring the data is open? Should there be a special relationship between OER and open learning data? What are the appropriate legal and/or normative approaches to encouraging open learning data? What are the missing elements in the open education system infrastructure that would better support the generation, sharing and use of learning data? How does data fit into the larger open ecosystem?

Emphasis is placed on the working nature of this session, with a goal of producing artifacts and interest in longer-term work to advance the open learning data space. Some preparatory material will be available as pre-reading at: http://oli.cmu.edu/get-to-know-oli/get-involved/opened2015/

Presenters
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Wednesday November 18, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Boardroom

11:30am

Web accessibility and Universal Design for Learning in OERs: Lessons learned from three projects
This special session takes an in-depth look at the accessibility efforts of BCcampus, CAST, and the FLOE Project as they relate to open educational resources.

1. User Testing Open Textbooks with Students with Print Disabilities

BCcampus will briefly describe the process of user testing open textbooks with post-secondary students who have print disabilities. The focus will be on the lessons learned in this process and how this data fed into the creation of a toolkit on accessibility for open textbook authors. Presenters will share failures and reflect on how to improve this process in the future. The presentation will showcase the BC Open Textbook Accessibility Toolkit and share best practices with the audience on how to make all open educational resources accessible, therefore making the materials truly open to all.

2. CAST projects

Project Open (https://open4us.org) is an initiative funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to help TAACCCT grantees meet OER, accessibility, and quality requirements for grant deliverables in the U.S. Department of Labor's two billion dollar Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College & Career Training (TAACCCT) program. We will describe the process of working with community and technical colleges to develop Open Educational Resources that follow universal design for learning (UDL) guidelines and web accessibility standards. We will focus on what we have learned about how to support UDL implementation and web accessibility best practices from our engagement with colleges through the largest OER initiative to date (the Department of Labor's TAACCCT program). We will showcase udloncampus.cast.org a set of web resources we have developed to help postsecondary stakeholders integrate Universal Design for Learning into the development of course materials, teaching methods and assessments and discuss how OER creators can move from addressing web accessibility to designing for all students through UDL.

The Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) Center (http://aem.cast.org/) has a mandate to provide technical assistance resources designed to increase the availability and use of curriculum resources and delivery systems designed accessible from the outset, including elementary, secondary, postsecondary and workforce-related OER. We will review best practices in OER creation with an emphasis on EPUB3; the emerging importance of equipping OERs with the capacity for data interoperability related to student usage, and we will emphasize the important role of accessibility as foundational component in the creation of UDL-aligned OER.

3. FLOE project

The FLOE Project (http://floeproject.org) leverages the diverse pool of Open Education Resources (OER) and the opportunity to create variants to optimize learning for the full diversity of learners. FLOE supports learners in discovering and refining their understanding of how they learn best, specifying this, and then the FLOE services can be used to match those needs for a given learning goal.

Presenters
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus
SJ

Sam Johnston

Research Scientist, CAST
Sam Johnston brings expertise in peer-based learning models, distance and blended education, and program evaluation to her work at CAST. With support of the Gates Foundation’s Open Professionals Education Network, she recently led the development of UDL On Campus (udloncampus.cast.org)--a collection of online resources to aid postsecondary educators in implementing UDL. | Her primary research focus is on the use of networked technology to... Read More →
avatar for Jutta Treviranus

Jutta Treviranus

Director, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC), professor and director of an innovative graduate program in inclusive design at OCAD University Toronto.(http://idrc.ocadu.ca, http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/inclusive_design.htm). The IDRC is an international center of expertise in digital inclusion. Jutta also heads the Inclusive Design Institute a multi-university regional research centre on... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Vancouver Island

11:30am

The entire package: OER research, implementation, success
How do you fit all of your OER tools together to drive use and student success? This presentation will walk you through the most recent OER research, effective institutional OER models, and the University of System of Georgia's recent large-scale efforts to adopt OER. Hear how others have planned and initiated OER programs as well as get ideas on driving large scale use of OER at your institution. Presenters include: John Hilton III of the Open Education Group at Brigham Young University, Nicole Finkbeiner of Rice University's OpenStax College, and Lauren Fancher of Affordable Learning Georgia / University System of Georgia.

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, Rice University's OpenStax
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations for community colleges prior to joining OpenStax College. When not promoting Open Education Resources, Nicole fills her time attending lectures, spending time... Read More →
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
BC Ballroom

11:30am

A Path to Open Learning Data?
As the recently published Asilomar Convention argues, the sharing of learning data is an essential element in maximizing the benefits of learning research; this call for open data as a public good is exceptionally well-aligned with the underlying philosophical foundations and practices of the open education community. This alignment suggests what should be a close relationship between open education and the open data & science communities—in theory, learner interactions with OER could produce Open Learning Data that would drive Open Scientific advances, in turn informing the future generations of educational resources.

In practice, however, the opening of learning data has proven more elusive, such that we continue to lack clear definitions and practices around Open Learning Data. Approaches that have served Open Data well in general have proven less useful in the educational data context, due to a combination of legitimate concerns for appropriately protecting learners, an excess of caution around the risks of opening learning data sets, and a regulator inheritance that is not always well suited to educational research. While some earlier attempts have been made to resolve these tensions, these attempts often rely on anonymizing approaches that can dramatically limit the utility of the data for scientists.

This working session will seek to begin the work of producing clearer and more useful definitions and practices around Open Learning Data, with an emphasis on the potential special relationship between the open education movement and the data that OER can produce. The session will begin with a very brief overview of the promises and challenges of open learning data, highlighting some current practices in the space. The majority of the session will be devoted to a discussion of Open Learning Data, ideally generating some draft definitions and approaches that can serve as foundational elements for continuing work beyond OpenEd 2015.

Key guiding questions for the discussion include: How do we define Open Learning Data? What constraints around access and use can be put in place while still ensuring the data is open? Should there be a special relationship between OER and open learning data? What are the appropriate legal and/or normative approaches to encouraging open learning data? What are the missing elements in the open education system infrastructure that would better support the generation, sharing and use of learning data? How does data fit into the larger open ecosystem?

Emphasis is placed on the working nature of this session, with a goal of producing artifacts and interest in longer-term work to advance the open learning data space. Some preparatory material will be available as pre-reading at: http://oli.cmu.edu/get-to-know-oli/get-involved/opened2015/

Presenters
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Wednesday November 18, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Boardroom

12:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday November 18, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
BC Ballroom

1:00pm

Affordable Learning Georgia: A High-Impact One-Year Retrospective
Affordable Learning Georgia (ALG), a University System of Georgia (USG) initiative within GALILEO, Georgia's Virtual Library, received funding in fiscal year 2015 to lower the price of textbooks for USG students. Within this one fiscal year, ALG has saved students $9 million in textbook costs over the next two fiscal years. Major projects include Textbook Transformation Grants, where faculty replace a commercial textbook with open, affordable, and library-provided materials, and supporting eCore, the USG's Online Core Curriculum, in implementing a free textbook replacement for all of its courses.

This presentation will provide a one-year retrospective on ALG and its projects, including lessons learned, testimonials from students and faculty, partnerships for scale and quality, training programs and instructional resources created, and reports on student success metrics such as course retention and progression.

Presenters
avatar for Jeff Gallant

Jeff Gallant

ALG Visiting Program Officer for OER, University System of Georgia


Wednesday November 18, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
BC Ballroom

1:00pm

The California Open Educational Resources Council: From Curation to Adoption
California's three public higher education systems (University of California, California State University, the California Community College System) enroll nearly 3 million undergraduate students and employ almost 100 thousand faculty. In 2012, the California State Legislature directed the three systems to create an online library of open educational resources to encourage the use of free or affordable textbooks and other materials throughout California's public higher education system. Composed of faculty representatives from each of the three systems, the California Open Educational Resources Council (CAOERC) was formed and charged in January, 2014, with collecting, peer-reviewing, helping to curate, publicizing, and cultivating the adoption of these open educational resources. Our presentation will: summarize our experience curating almost 200 textbooks for 50 cross-segmental courses; report on our current adoption efforts and strategies, including the use of focus groups to better understand the OER adoption process and a pilot project using faculty grants to encourage OER adoption; evaluate our successes and challenges; and, offer a glimpse into the future of CAOERC.

Presenters
DD

Dolores Davison

Area B Representative, Academic Senate for California Community Colleges
avatar for Lawrence Hanley

Lawrence Hanley

Assoc. Professor, SF State University


Wednesday November 18, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Waddington Room

1:00pm

Exploring the what, why, and how of social learning analytics in open higher education Connected Learning environments.
Connected Learning is an emerging pedagogical framework that promotes student engagement, empowerment, and deeper learning through networked participation in open, digital environments. In higher education settings, Connected Learning practitioners tend to engage students in blogging and microblogging activities to stimulate learning through connectivity, defined as the act of linking people, information, and resources across space, time, and semiotic domains. However, one of the barriers to the advancement of Connected Learning in higher education settings is a lack of student assessment practices and protocols that align with or are relevant to the Connected Learning pedagogical approach. Traditional assessments tend to consist of written tests or examinations meant to measure course content acquisition and recall. The emphasis on a static and standardized body of information is problematic Connected Learning environments, where learning processes, networking literacies, and individualized learning outcomes are privileged over course content. Meaningful, pedagogically aligned, and logistically feasible assessments are needed to support and document Connected Learning.

As a uniquely digital form of student assessment, social learning analytics offer compelling opportunities for the documentation of Connected Learning. They capitalize on the digital traces left by social media-based learning activities to tell a story of digital interaction, participation, and knowledge construction. Social network analytics use centrality metrics to provide a real-time overview and visualization of student navigation within a social learning network. Discourse analytics that focus on the use of annotation systems (e.g. tagging, hyperlinking, mentioning) may reveal the specifics of how students navigate groups and content within the context of blogging and microblogging activities. Both types of analytics might be harnessed to provide ethical, integrated, sustainable, and scalable assessments of Connected Learning goals and objectives.

This presentation reports on a study that explores the capacity for social network and discourse analytics to address the challenge of documenting student participation in open Connected Learning spaces. In the study, these methods are used to assess student connectivity in blogging and microblogging activities executed as part of university-based Connected Learning courses. Social network and discourse analytics are evaluated for their ability to support real-time, self-, and peer-assessment while providing actionable data for faculty and students, alike. As part of an initial validation process, results of the social network and discourse analyses are compared to a student perception survey and content analysis of the same data.

Presenters
avatar for Laura Gogia

Laura Gogia

Business Intelligence Liaison, State Council of Higher Education for Virginia
I design and write about connected learning experiences in higher and adult education settings. I help people learn to navigate the open web for the purposes of lifelong learning, collaboration, professional development, community engagement, and fun .



Wednesday November 18, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Vancouver Island

1:00pm

1:30pm

Welcome to the Agora: Creating new faculty and student experiences through open tools and open pedagogy
The Agora (http://udg.theagoraonline.net ) is an open, blended faculty development experience that was co-developed by the JIBC (http://jibc.ca) and the CIEP Docentes (a http://ciep.cga.udg.mx ) at the University of Guadalajara (UdG). Approximately 300 UdG professors are enrolled in a 6 month Diploma at UdG, with a focus teaching professors how to create student centred experiences supported by mobile devices. The JIBC team consists of a broad group of open educators and facilitators and includes Terri Bateman, Ken Bauer, Jorge Enrique López Campos, Barb Kidd, Brian Lamb, Alan Levine, Tannis Morgan, and Nancy White. The Agora functions as a metaphor for an open, collaborative space on the open web, and builds on a number of existing tools and initiatives such as the TRU YouShow (TRU Writer) and DS 106 (challenge bank, daily try). Studios and challenges created by the team exist online as CC licensed content, and the Agora site can be easily reused or cloned to other WP instances. In addition, an open tool called Discourse (http://discourse.org/) is being used as a semi-open online discussion space. The #udgagora functions as project glue to connect the various F2F and online activities. The program is designed around a series of F2F and online hands-on studios where participants are required to complete and share openly a number of challenges - small, achievable tasks that centre on active learning techniques or mobile/multimedia creation – within the context of the studios. In the 8 week online portion that follows the initial 2 week F2F, participants are required to implement some of these challenges with their students, and report back student feedback on the implementation. In order to provide more localized support during the planning and implementation of challenges with their students, participants were placed into triads as a collaboration and feedback mechanism that occurs either F2F on their campuses or via other means. A collective, open artifact of implementations will be created in a TRU Writer type tool. This presentation will describe the co-design, co-development and implementation of the Agora and will highlight both the surprises and challenges encountered.

Presenters
avatar for Terri Bateman

Terri Bateman

Instructional Designer
I do instructional design and faculty development primarily in adult distance/blended/online education. I work as an independent contractor for various organizations and post-secondary institutions. Twitter @terribateman
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director Innovation, Thompson Rivers University
I'm most interested in: | | * a vision of open education in which open practices and open technologies are at least as important as OER. | | * a vision of higher educational institutions that embraces their mandate as stewards of knowledge and inquiry. To me that means more permeable boundaries, more engagement with the wider world, and a renewed commitment to public service in learning. | | * playing the drums at the jam... Read More →
avatar for Alan Levine

Alan Levine

Top Dog, CogDog It
Barks about and plays with web tech. Likes photography, guitars, storytelling, blogging, hiking, coding, the Who. Hates egos and spammers. Has shots.
avatar for Tannis Morgan

Tannis Morgan

Associate Dean, Centre for Teaching, Learning & In, JIBC


Wednesday November 18, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
BC Ballroom

1:30pm

The California Open Educational Resources Council: From Curation to Adoption
California's three public higher education systems (University of California, California State University, the California Community College System) enroll nearly 3 million undergraduate students and employ almost 100 thousand faculty. In 2012, the California State Legislature directed the three systems to create an online library of open educational resources to encourage the use of free or affordable textbooks and other materials throughout California's public higher education system. Composed of faculty representatives from each of the three systems, the California Open Educational Resources Council (CAOERC) was formed and charged in January, 2014, with collecting, peer-reviewing, helping to curate, publicizing, and cultivating the adoption of these open educational resources. Our presentation will: summarize our experience curating almost 200 textbooks for 50 cross-segmental courses; report on our current adoption efforts and strategies, including the use of focus groups to better understand the OER adoption process and a pilot project using faculty grants to encourage OER adoption; evaluate our successes and challenges; and, offer a glimpse into the future of CAOERC.

Presenters
DD

Dolores Davison

Area B Representative, Academic Senate for California Community Colleges
avatar for Lawrence Hanley

Lawrence Hanley

Assoc. Professor, SF State University


Wednesday November 18, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Waddington Room

1:30pm

Open, Sez Me: The demands and rewards of open pedagogy
Discussions of open education take into account many different roles: the teacher, the creator, the administrator, the funder. What about the student? What does it take to learn in an open participatory environment? What does it take to revise, remix and redistribute?

While open education at the level of OERs might be transparent to students, educationally if not financially, taking open pedagogy further to involve students in the kind of open creative exploration enabled by the internet would not. It both demands and develops emerging skill sets fundamental to lifelong learning. This presentation will look at open pedagogy in the context of lifelong learning skills, considering what those skills are and how they can be developed.

Presenters
avatar for Paul Bond

Paul Bond

Library Instruction Coordinator, University of Pittsburgh-Johnstown
I'm into lifelong learning, open education, information literacy, and playing around on the internet. That why I became a librarian.



Wednesday November 18, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Boardroom

1:30pm

Open and Connected Faculty Development
Thompson Rivers University, a founding member of OERu, employs approximately 250 faculty to deliver about 400 online courses to 12,000 students per year. Because our faculty are geographically dispersed, we need to rely on distance technologies to provide faculty development opportunities and to build a sense of community.

TRU Open Learning's recently released series of openly licensed (CC-BY-SA) mini-courses are built to utilize the extensibility and social characteristics of WordPress as an open platform, including the experimental SPLOT tools designed by Alan Levine and Brian Lamb.

This presentation will outline the structure of the courses as well as preliminary observations of how the open content and platform affect faculty community, confidence, and capacity in teaching online. The presenters will provide an update on the first six months of participation in the courses as well as the ways in which others are exercising their 5R rights to the series.

Presenters
avatar for Colin Madland

Colin Madland

Director, Online Shenanigans, Trinity Western University


Wednesday November 18, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Vancouver Island

2:00pm

Room Transfer
Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:00pm - 2:15pm
On Your Own

2:15pm

Evaluating the K-12 OER Collaborative
The K-12 OER Collaborative is an initiative led by a group of 12 states with the goal of creating comprehensive, high-quality, open educational resources (OER) that are aligned with state learning standards. The project will produce full-course OER for grades K-12 in mathematics and English language arts. These materials, licensed using CC BY, will be available in multiple formats and on multiple platforms. See http://k12oercollaborative.org/

The Collaborative team will describe their plans for evaluating the impact of the project and lead a discussion with attendees about differing ways to measure the impact. The full materials will not yet be released by the time of the conference, so the feedback from this session will be important as the Collaborative refines its evaluation strategy.

Key issues include:

* Tracking implementation and dissemination of the materials in multiple formats.

* In many cases, schools will be replacing existing materials with OER (Level 0, in Wiley's Remix Hypothesis - http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3813). What evaluation methods work better for these implementations?

* Measuring the potential impact on student achievement using state assessment data.

* When the materials are adapted, how do you evaluate student performance when the materials may differ from district-to-district, teacher-to-teacher?

* Are there ways to measure and evaluate the community that grows up around the materials?

Presenters
avatar for Karl Nelson

Karl Nelson

Director, Digital Learning, WA OSPI
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.
avatar for Jennifer Wolfe

Jennifer Wolfe

Partner, The Learning Accelerator


Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
BC Ballroom

2:15pm

Alberta OER Progress
Albertaoer.com was launched in 2014 with a mandate to bring Alberta post-secondary institutions together in support of open educational resources. Two million dollars was provided to the University of Alberta, in trust, to lead a project to:
  • Assist with reducing the cost of a post-secondary education for students; and,
  • Provide students and faculty members with the flexibility they need, offering updated, relevant content for learning.
A provincial steering committee was established which led to the award of a series of grants in the three categories, namely: sustainability, creation/use and promotion. The “Awareness” grant category intends to support the cultural change needed throughout institutions of Alberta to utilize and support OER provincially. The “Content” grant category intends to support the use of existing OER materials by supplementing current material with complementary content. This includes test items and course wraps, lesson plans, presentations, etc. The “Sustainability” grant category intends to support capacity development and ensure that a sustainable foundation to support OER initiatives is established. This includes technical infrastructure, institutional needs, etc.

With over 90 applications, a total of 15 projects were successful in receiving funding. This session will focus on the process followed, including research and communications plans, as well as future directions of the project. 

The Initiative grant selection process was aligned to the following intended Outcomes: Learner Impact, Cost-Savings, Collaboration, Enhance Awareness and Support for OER, Sustainability of OER in Alberta.  The intent was for each accepted proposal to support capacity development and ensure that a sustainable foundation to support OER initiatives was established. Criteria included CC licensing, demonstration of cost-savings, inter-departmental / inter-institutional collaboration, and meeting of more than one grant category. 
In addition to these 18 projects, the initiative has also funded an open call attendance of the Open Education Conference to all Campus Alberta institutions. Those attending the conference have been reimbursed and have provided the committee a 1 page reflection of the conference. 

Promotion of the initiative was strongly championed by VP Academic leaders in each of the 26 Campus Alberta institutions. Without their distribution of initiative announcements, the awareness would have been challenging. 

Presenters
avatar for Janet Welch

Janet Welch

Assistant Dean / Executive Director - Technologies in Education, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta
University of Alberta



Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Vancouver Island

2:15pm

The Role of Multi-access Learning in Mainstreaming Open Education
Multi-access learning (Irvine, 2009; Irvine, 2010; Irvine, Code, & Richards, 2013) is the expansion of mainstream brick-and-mortar campus face-to-face courses into online modalities without creating a separate stream of online offerings. Once a course is in part online, the synergies between having choice of modalities and opportunities for supporting diverse and concurrent learning pathways are considerable. New flexibilities can inform and influence new pedagogies to transform pre-existing beliefs about online and open. For today's learners, there is less "distinction between face-to-face and virtual," which may lead to a greater acceptance and demand for online learning modalities compared to previous generations (Mulder, 2011, para. 5). It is hopeful the next step is for less distinction between online and open.

In this session, the multi-access framework will be reviewed, along with its affordances. We will also report on instructor perspectives. The instructors of closed versions of multi-access courses were interviewed regarding their course experiences and their perceptions about closed and open online pedagogy. As open culture begins to pervade post-secondary campuses, there is a growing need to understand the practices and processes successful instructors enact in these open environments to facilitate community, deal with issues of control and power, and to implement successful strategies for learning design in open modalities. In addition, in order to mainstream open education, the inhibiting factors preventing instructors from traversing out of closed practices need to be identified and overcome.

Presenters
avatar for Valerie Irvine

Valerie Irvine

Co-Director, TIE Research Lab, University of Victoria
UVic
avatar for Tatiana Little

Tatiana Little

Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Rich McCue

Rich McCue

Systems Administrator, University of Victoria
avatar for Michael Paskevicius

Michael Paskevicius

Learning Technologies Application Developer, Vancouver Island University
I currently work as a Learning Technology Application Developer in the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at Vancouver Island University. My role involves researching and deploying educational technologies, administering, developing and integrating elearning software and developing faculty competencies in the use of emerging technologies.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Waddington Room

2:15pm

Expansive Openness in K-12 Teacher Practice
This mixed methods study seeks to identify and explore teacher perspectives on the potentials and barriers to openness in K12 educational practice. Pulling upon previous work focused on open educational resources (OER), open source software, open scholarship, open publishing, and open courses, this study operates on an expansive or inclusive understanding of openness that emphasizes adoption, adaptation, and sharing of educational resources. Operating on this expansive definition, the researcher first conducted a series of summer institutes with practicing K12 teachers to introduce them to the concept and to give them hands-on experience with openness in action. Participants were then recruited from institute attendees (n = 101), and qualitative data was collected during incubator sessions, modeled as large focus groups, during the institutes.

Qualitative data was analyzed phenomenologically to ascertain participants' experiences and perspectives on the potentials and barriers of expansive openness in practice. Qualitative results were also utilized to construct a survey, which was distributed to participants six months after the institute, for the purpose of verifying qualitative results and establishing a unified voice from participants. Results revealed that participants uniformly believed that openness offers pedagogical, economic, and professional potentials for practice, but that major barriers to adoption exist at the macro and local levels.

First, the most important potentials and barriers to openness are not bounded by grade level. This means that all K12 teachers should have no problem finding common ground in advocating for shifts to openness and that traditional siloes that serve to divide and weaken their voice for change should be ignored in light of such overwhelming commonalities.

Second, openness is more than economy. The freedoms afforded by open practices have great promise for improving the pedagogy and professionalism in our educational institutions as educators are empowered to differentiate, collaborate, and innovate in ways that were impossible under non-open paradigms.

And third, the biggest barriers are systemic and institutional, not personal. Personal barriers are likely symptoms or reflections of local and macro problems, rather than the reverse. This means that solutions must start by addressing the problems at their source by engaging legislators and administrators and helping them to understand these identified problems in a more realistic manner.

In concluding this study, we believe that openness in practice has great promise for K12 teaching and learning globally and encourage educators, researchers, and legislators alike to reexamine the meaning of open in educational practice and to advocate for those practices that lead to greater freedom and professionalization of teaching.

Presenters
avatar for Royce Kimmons

Royce Kimmons

Assistant Professor, Brigham Young University


Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Boardroom

2:45pm

Exploring the Impact of Open Textbooks: Cost savings, Efficacy and Beyond
Evidence for the impact of open textbooks is critical to making the case for the use of OER in the classroom. Open textbooks have been shown to have a range of impacts with particularly strong evidence for student cost savings and emerging evidence that using open textbooks rather than proprietary textbooks result in at least similar test score results (for example: Wiley et al, 2012; Hilton III et al, 2012; Bliss et al, 2013). But what other impacts and benefits are open textbooks having on students and educators? And what do these findings tell us about next steps for mainstreaming the use of open textbooks?

This session will explore and contextualize the latest research conducted by the OER Research Hub (http://oerresearchhub.org) on the efficacy and impact of open textbooks. In particular the presentation will focus on presenting the latest research findings from collaborative research with OpenStax College (http://openstaxcollege.org) whilst contextualizing these findings within other research conducted with educators using open textbooks and other types of OER. Research to date has revealed a range of wider impacts of open textbooks, including increased likelihood of educators using other OER, increased likelihood of contributing to improving material and discussing OER with others, including their institutional administrators.

Presenters
avatar for Bea de los Arcos

Bea de los Arcos

Research Associate, The Open University
Dr. Beatriz de los Arcos Researcher, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, United Kingdom | Researching the impact of OER on teaching and learning practices with colleagues at the OER Research Hub Project; leading the project's collaboration with educational programs in the K12 sector. |  
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
BC Ballroom

2:45pm

The Role of Multi-access Learning in Mainstreaming Open Education
Multi-access learning (Irvine, 2009; Irvine, 2010; Irvine, Code, & Richards, 2013) is the expansion of mainstream brick-and-mortar campus face-to-face courses into online modalities without creating a separate stream of online offerings. Once a course is in part online, the synergies between having choice of modalities and opportunities for supporting diverse and concurrent learning pathways are considerable. New flexibilities can inform and influence new pedagogies to transform pre-existing beliefs about online and open. For today's learners, there is less "distinction between face-to-face and virtual," which may lead to a greater acceptance and demand for online learning modalities compared to previous generations (Mulder, 2011, para. 5). It is hopeful the next step is for less distinction between online and open.

In this session, the multi-access framework will be reviewed, along with its affordances. We will also report on instructor perspectives. The instructors of closed versions of multi-access courses were interviewed regarding their course experiences and their perceptions about closed and open online pedagogy. As open culture begins to pervade post-secondary campuses, there is a growing need to understand the practices and processes successful instructors enact in these open environments to facilitate community, deal with issues of control and power, and to implement successful strategies for learning design in open modalities. In addition, in order to mainstream open education, the inhibiting factors preventing instructors from traversing out of closed practices need to be identified and overcome.

Presenters
avatar for Valerie Irvine

Valerie Irvine

Co-Director, TIE Research Lab, University of Victoria
UVic
avatar for Tatiana Little

Tatiana Little

Thompson Rivers University
avatar for Rich McCue

Rich McCue

Systems Administrator, University of Victoria
avatar for Michael Paskevicius

Michael Paskevicius

Learning Technologies Application Developer, Vancouver Island University
I currently work as a Learning Technology Application Developer in the Centre for Innovation and Excellence in Learning at Vancouver Island University. My role involves researching and deploying educational technologies, administering, developing and integrating elearning software and developing faculty competencies in the use of emerging technologies.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Waddington Room

2:45pm

SPLOTs and Darkweb Plots: Advancing and Supporting Open Educational Experiences
Recent years have seen significant progress in the creation and sharing of open educational resources. Yet as Martin Weller's book attests, while open may be winning the battle, in the trenches it doesn't feel like victory. Resource-constrained institutions face continued struggles to foster open online educational experiences. Choosing and supporting tools, convincing peers and partners to take risks are as difficult to do as ever. Meanwhile, the discourse around learning environments seems to have hardened between the provision of centrally-managed and rigidly controlled systems vs the wide-open "personal cyberinfrastructure" approach. Is this dichotomy realistic or useful?

This session explores these tensions and looks for middle ground. We survey a range of developments such as the Reclaim/Domain of One's Own movement, Connected Courses, and the OERu network's collaborative course framework. But have learning technologists done enough to make open web environments inviting and appealing? What if we make ease of use and sustainable support the prime consideration in learning tool design? How about incorporating tools that do not ask require user accounts or personal identifying data? We demonstrate an approach of simple, discrete, task-oriented open tools intended to provide an inviting on-ramp to open practice, minimize support needs, and work around concerns of student privacy and data collection. We will also explore the implications of recent advances for technical infrastructure that promise a future in which we share and rapidly deploy robust learning tools and environments the way we presently share OER.

Discussion of these developments might lead to a set of principles, suggestions and warnings to guide the future development of convivial, publicly-engaged and learning-centered online spaces: ones that are not just the extremes of the edges, but all the spaces in between.

Presenters
avatar for Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Director Innovation, Thompson Rivers University
I'm most interested in: | | * a vision of open education in which open practices and open technologies are at least as important as OER. | | * a vision of higher educational institutions that embraces their mandate as stewards of knowledge and inquiry. To me that means more permeable boundaries, more engagement with the wider world, and a renewed commitment to public service in learning. | | * playing the drums at the jam... Read More →
avatar for Alan Levine

Alan Levine

Top Dog, CogDog It
Barks about and plays with web tech. Likes photography, guitars, storytelling, blogging, hiking, coding, the Who. Hates egos and spammers. Has shots.


Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Boardroom

2:45pm

It's so much more than saving students' money: Using Open Pedagogy to reduce the social learning barriers for students in the Global Discovery Program
For the last 5 years, student groups have been coming over from the University of Kitakyushu (UKK) to spend 6 months studying at Tacoma Community College (TCC). They study at TCC for 2 quarters, earning 30 credits which transfer directly to the UKK. The partnership has been a success for both colleges. International students pay significantly more in tuition. International student families frequently feel sticker shock due to the cost of traditional textbook prices in the United States. The Communication Department transitioned to OER to support student success, then dove into Open Pedagogy to support social learning. The courses are half filled with visiting students from the Global Discovery Program and half filled with mostly native English speaking students. A service learning project that involved students in the design of the project and the selection of the reading materials led to surprisingly advanced levels of social interaction and learning. Participants will hear from faculty and students.

Presenters
avatar for Christie Fierro

Christie Fierro

Instructional Designer & Open Educational Resource, Tacoma Community College


Wednesday November 18, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Vancouver Island

3:15pm

Break
Coffee & tea provided

Wednesday November 18, 2015 3:15pm - 3:30pm
On Your Own

3:30pm

How OER increased student success: Lessons from TCC's Z Degree
With over 2,500 students completing z courses the results are in and the data supports the claim that OER makes a difference in the student experience. In this session, Tidewater Community College will share the results of the 2-year pilot of its A.S. in Business Administration Z Degree with an emphasis on student success, retention and persistence.

Removing textbook costs was the initial driver behind TCC's Z Degree, but the team quickly realized that the true power of OER is its ability to allow a course to become laser focused on learning outcomes. Participants will see examples from z courses where the selection and alignment of OER have made significant impacts on student learning and engagement. Faculty developers and project leadership will share the process for not just creating, but improving these courses in order to realize additional gains in areas of alignment, authentic assessment and pedagogically sound course design and delivery. The panel will also share their insights and experiences rebuilding existing courses as they adopt and adapt existing OER to align with course outcomes.

Presenters
DD

Daniel DeMarte

Vice President for Academic Affairs & CAO, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
BC Ballroom

3:30pm

OER investments that work: initiative models that save students money and contribute to their success
As the open movement picks up steam, many colleges and universities are planning OER initiatives. But what does a successful OER initiative look like? Which project models correlate to student savings and success? What institutional investments payoff? We plan to use a combination of surveying and interviewing to examine how model characteristics, like funding, release-time provided, incentivization, initiative leadership, etc. correlate to measures of success, like student savings, performance, completion and retention.

When creating a new open initiative, institutions face multiple organizational choices. Who will lead the initiative? Will there be a steering committee? What should the initiative prioritize? Do we need to advocate for funding? How much? How should we use those funds? Should we provide participants with release-time? Should we partner with external companies? We plan to investigate how these choices correlate to measures of success in order to describe model characteristics that work.

Open makes sense to those of us advocating at our institutions. We believe that OER adoption and open course development saves students money and makes them more successful. In order to convince colleagues at our institutions as well as legislators, grant organizations and funding agencies many OER initiatives are tracking student savings and increasingly collecting metrics related to student success, like student performance, completion, and retention in courses that use open resources. We plan to investigate how these metrics of success relate to initiative models.

We hypothesize that larger institutions will invest in organized initiatives with significant planning and goal-setting, identifiable leaders, and compensation or release-time supported by administration in order to see positive and sustainable outcomes. Smaller institutions, we suspect, may be able to achieve successful programs that require less structure and financial investment, depending more upon personal relationships and influence.

The results of this research will be useful to faculty, librarians, administrators and staff planning new OER initiatives to help them advocate for appropriate resources and get set up for measurable success. We intend to openly publish our findings and present highlights at OpenEd15.

Presenters
avatar for Jen  Klaudinyi

Jen Klaudinyi

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Portland Community College
I am the co-chair of the OER steering committee at Portland Community College, a large institution. I am thinking about the most effective ways to design open initiatives and support faculty adoption of open materials. I am new to PCC. I formerly led the OER Faculty Fellowship at Lane Community College (a medium sized institution with a more focused and funded OER support program).


Wednesday November 18, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Waddington Room

3:30pm

The identified informal learner: recognising assessed learning in the open
Digital badging as a global trend across educational sectors is now recognised. It offers a new way to reward and motivate learners, providing evidence of skills and achievements in a variety of formal and informal settings. As the diversification of OER across multiple platform types and formats has evolved to suit different learners and educators alike, so the notion of recognition for informal learning in these spheres has become accepted provision by some educators and philanthropic providers, where it can be achieved at scale.

Badged Open Courses (BOCs) were piloted by The Open University (OU) in 2013. The project built on research into the motivations and demographic profiles of learners using free educational resources which the OU makes available through its OpenLearn platform. This work was repeated in 2014 and found that an increasing proportion of learners are keen to have their informal learning achievements recognised. Based on all these data, a suite of free employability and skills BOCs was launched in February 2015.

The Open University (OU) currently attracts over 4.4 million informal learners annually to its free public provision on OpenLearn (www.open.edu/openlearn), with around 39 million in total having visited the site. OpenLearn hosts over 850 free courses drawn from undergraduate and post graduate course provision, released under a full Creative Commons licence. The primary aim is to introduce the opportunity to learn to those that might not otherwise have considered the option, and to help prepare those who want to make the next step from informal to formal learning.

The OU has attempted to demonstrate an ongoing institutional commitment to new models of teaching, learning and assessment in the open to serve both informal learners and students. Existing metrics show that OpenLearn attracts a very balanced demographic compared to the potentially ‘over served' cohorts attending MOOC engines.

All learners that study a BOC participate in a number of online assessments delivered through the deployment of Moodle quizzes. The courses are designed to be as robust as any of the OU's modules in terms of quality and pedagogy: they follow strict learning design procedures, academic authoring, assessment and critical readership.

This presentation reports on initial findings of the 2015 BOCs and how they build on what we now know of the strategic importance of free learning recognition. Initial results reveal that the majority of respondents declare that it provides a sense of achievement in the absence of any tutor-led instruction and that they would be sharing their achievement with their employer. In terms of impact to the business, metrics compare favourably with informal learning per se, with 29% of learners visiting the BOCs going on to view the OU's qualifications webpages. This is more than twice the percentage of the average OpenLearn learner.

Presenters
avatar for Anna Page

Anna Page

Senior Producer (Open Education Projects), The Open University
I'm involved in the Opening Educational Practices in Scotland project oepscotland.org


Wednesday November 18, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Vancouver Island

3:30pm

PUB101: The Publication of Self in Everyday Life
PUB101: The Publication of Self in Everyday Life is founded on a radically student-centered model, in which students build out their own personal cyberinfrastructure, then elaborate editorial voice, design and identity, message and audience: building, reflecting, and sharing within a community of practice in the course. Two concerns are ever-present: How to assess the myriad forms of writing and how students meet the course's institutional requirements (specifically essays and peer reviews) in an online environment -- reconciling individual expression and development with the needs of a foundations publishing course.

Assessment is continually evolving as learning goals are expressed more in terms of disposition and confidence than skills and abilities. Constructively interacting and learning through contemporary media, and increasingly through open access, is a core component of PUB101. Through experience, evaluations, and research into other academic programs also piloting open learning constructs, we have gathered our insights, but also questions to share at Open Ed.

Presenters
JM

John Maxwell

Ass. Professor, Publishing @ SFU
Faculty


Wednesday November 18, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Boardroom

4:00pm

How OER increased student success: Lessons from TCC's Z Degree
With over 2,500 students completing z courses the results are in and the data supports the claim that OER makes a difference in the student experience. In this session, Tidewater Community College will share the results of the 2-year pilot of its A.S. in Business Administration Z Degree with an emphasis on student success, retention and persistence.

Removing textbook costs was the initial driver behind TCC's Z Degree, but the team quickly realized that the true power of OER is its ability to allow a course to become laser focused on learning outcomes. Participants will see examples from z courses where the selection and alignment of OER have made significant impacts on student learning and engagement. Faculty developers and project leadership will share the process for not just creating, but improving these courses in order to realize additional gains in areas of alignment, authentic assessment and pedagogically sound course design and delivery. The panel will also share their insights and experiences rebuilding existing courses as they adopt and adapt existing OER to align with course outcomes.

Presenters
DD

Daniel DeMarte

Vice President for Academic Affairs & CAO, Tidewater Community College
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
BC Ballroom

4:00pm

OER at Scale through CLIx - the Connected Learning Initiative
Quality. Scale. Impact. Each of these describes the challenges facing educational innovation, and especially open education innovation. We're flipping typical approaches on their head, and using scale as an input rather than a quality to be achieved by educational innovation. And we're doing this by leveraging Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Education Practice (OEP) reinforced with strong professional development activities. These form the inputs to the Connected Learning Initiative (CLIx)—led by MIT, the Tata Institute for Social Sciences and the Tata Trusts. CLIx will incorporate thoughtful pedagogical design and leverage contemporary technology, including online capabilities, to provide quality educational content and experiences at scale. The initiative aims to reach a total of approximately 1,000 schools and 150,000 students in high school in 3 states in India during 2015–2017, as well as conduct professional development for approximately 2,700 teachers.

CLIx catalyzes access to quality learning opportunities at scale that are capable of changing what Indian students and teachers know and can do. We believe that a massive quality intervention, providing curricular alternatives to students and teachers through the power of OER and OEP, can irreversibly 'change the game', improving the Indian education system and what Indian youth learn.

We'll present an overview of the project with our initial plans, review the mathematics sciences and English modules we have under development, and describe the delivery platform and implementation challenges. And we'll discuss how we can and are leveraging the CLIx model to reach underserved populations around the world.

Presenters
avatar for Brandon Muramatsu

Brandon Muramatsu

Assistant Director, Strategic Education Initiative, MIT


Wednesday November 18, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Waddington Room

4:00pm

Enough with Weak Sauce Badges!
We have been issuing open badges for two years, and have had many conversations on the potential value of open badges with university faculty, K-12 administrators, technology coordinators, teachers, and researchers. Often the first step in these conversations is to attempt to rewire misconceptions about open badges and what they can represent in teaching/learning systems. One of the biggest challenges we have seen in the badging community is a flood of badges for things as useless as attendance, creating a login, or simply existing as a learner. We believe these badges represent a misunderstanding of the basic concepts of assessment, credentialing, and the supposed benefit of a credential to learners who indeed do want their badges to signal knowledge, skills, or expertise to others. In addition, we believe this flood of "lightweight" badges have given the general public a poor impression of badges, requiring all of us to persuade stakeholders that badging can, in fact, be rigorous. It is our real concern that if the badging community does not show how open badges can be rigorous and meaningful, that the badging movement will fade away as a fun diversion, but one that ultimately had no real impact on educational reform.

In this presentation, we will attempt to do what Joseph (2014) argued the badging community needed: more people talking to each other about badging, instead of just to potential critics or adopters. In doing so, we will begin our presentation by overviewing the variety of badges available, and discuss the concept of lightweight versus heavyweight badges (terms already being used to discuss this divide). We will then explain the rationale some have given for lightweight badges, and follow with our counter argument for why this lightweight approach to badging weakens the badging movement, diminishes the signaling power of earned badges, and clutters the ability of people to find meaningful badges. We will then provide our argument for why badge providers should focus on the rigor of their badges, and strive to create badges of consequence. We will also provide suggestions on how we, as a community, might be able to bolster the badging movement.

Presenters
avatar for Daniel Randall

Daniel Randall

Ph.D. Candidate, Brigham Young University
avatar for Rick West

Rick West

Associate professor, Brigham Young University
I study learning communities and how to assess/evaluate learning, performance, and innovation within a given community. Currently, I am researching Communities of Innovation, a framework for understanding group innovative processes, as well as techniques for improving online collaborative learning. I have also done research on K-16 technology integration strategies. I also study and develop open badges for preservice education (see... Read More →


Wednesday November 18, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Boardroom

4:00pm

Designing and using open pedagogies for the 5Rs: the Opening Educational Practices in Scotland experience
Supporting organisations adopt open education practices (OEP) via cross-sector partnerships to enable the design and use of open materials is the purpose of the Opening Educational Practices in Scotland project (OEPS). It builds on previous experiences of collaborative partnership working (Macintyre, 2013, Cannell & Macintyre, 2013). Although Open Educational Resources (OER) could be transformative and widen access to higher education (D'Antoni, 2013) this promise hasn't been widely realised, with many unaware of the potential benefits of OER and most MOOC users already HE qualified (Edinburgh University, 2013). OEPS endorses the Open Scotland Declaration (http://declaration.openscot.net/) which encourages organisations, teachers and learners to adopt OER.

OEPS is extending the 5Rs of OER (Wiley, 2014) to the wider sector of HE, FE and beyond via partnerships between HE learning design professionals and Scottish organisations with specialist expertise to share but no pedagogic knowledge to create robust OER. It does this via a growing peer support network, workshops, pilot schemes and an online hub for sharing good practice. This supports OER and OEP concept exploration and the extent to which organisations feel able to share resources they develop for the benefit of communities of learners.

OEPS is facilitating more development of OpenLearn Works where users can share OER so learners can retain, reuse, revise, remix and redistribute resources at any time. The platform encourages users to share all resources via a CC BY NC SA licence at the very least. It also supports badged open courses.

This presentation focusses on some of the collaborative partnership-created OER exemplars, some using badging, issues raised during creation, and the first 3 months use of the Opening Educational Practices hub.

Presenters
avatar for Anna Page

Anna Page

Senior Producer (Open Education Projects), The Open University
I'm involved in the Opening Educational Practices in Scotland project oepscotland.org


Wednesday November 18, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Vancouver Island

5:00pm

Social
Come join us for appetizers and a cash bar on the 15th floor of the beautiful Fairmont Hotel Vancouver. DJ Dr. Jones (aka Jason Toal) will be on hand spinning a completely Creative Commons licensed set of music. Don't miss this kickoff OpenEd event.

Wednesday November 18, 2015 5:00pm - 9:00pm
Roof Lounge
 
Thursday, November 19
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Thursday November 19, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
BC Ballroom

8:30am

Reducing Student Barriers to Education: The Impact of Adopting Open Educational Resources (OER) for all undergraduate courses
In an effort to address concerns of student access, affordability, and success, University of Maryland University College set an ambitious goal – to adopt open educational resources (OER) in all of its undergraduate courses. In less than two years, a team comprised of subject matter experts, instructional designers, and librarians identified, evaluated and, when necessary, revised OERs for use in each course.

To assess the impact of OER adoption, we examined the course completion rates and final grades of over 34,000 students in 92 courses before and after adoption of OERs. In the sampled courses, failure and withdrawal rates were lower after the adoption of OERs and completion rates rose by 1.8%. The potential cost savings for the students in the after OER sample exceeds $1.6 million. In total, we estimate the potential costs savings for all UMUC students to exceed $5 million. Our initial evaluation suggests that the transition to OERs does not diminish learning or completion rates and provides students with no-cost, high-quality learning materials. To continue our work measuring the impact of openness on student success, we will be employing rigorous data analyses and appropriate controls to evaluate the effects on our population of over 90,000 students.

Presenters
KH

Katrice Hawthorne

Associate Director for Evaluation and Research, UMUC
avatar for Karen Vignare

Karen Vignare

Vice Provost, Center for Innovation in Learning &, UMUC
Karen currently serves as Vice Provost, the Center for Innovation in Learning at University of Maryland University College (UMUC) leading the search and evaluation for next generation learning models. The Center for Innovation in Learning serves as the research and development arm of UMUC’s academic organization. Dr. Vignare is responsible for identifying innovations and collaboratively implementing with core teams at UMUC. Areas of... Read More →


Thursday November 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:00am
BC Ballroom

8:30am

Tackling a lack of local OER: How international OER adoption enhanced the quality of learning on campus
Many OER folks may recognize well that the limited number of OER collections in local language hinders OER from realizing their potential. Although tons of English OER reside in the web space, international OER adoption seldom happens due to many barriers, such as cultural and language differences, funding issues, institutional decision making process, and more. As Japan is no exception to this, we couldn't have been fully utilizing OER for their primary objective - enhancing the quality of teaching and learning.

However, recent government-funded project that started in Hokkaido area of Japan (the biggest prefecture in Japan) has paved the way for the effective localization of OER. Academic Commons for Education (ACE), the project launched in Hokkaido University, develops OER for Japanese students to learn information literacy. These OER are designed by revising existing OER from OLI (Open Learning Initiative) at Carnegie Mellon University. Instructional designers, video producers, and a professor work together to translate and revise contents so that they fit Japanese context. Created OER are ""redistributed"" to seven different universities in Hokkaido area as a credit-bearing course by distance learning using videoconferencing, allowing students at the edge of the prefecture to study with us. It is "openness" of OER that enables us to localize resources based on various aspects not only translation but also technical and cultural needs.

In this talk, we will discuss the details of the adoption process, including translation, cultural consideration, and effective instructional means for OER, as well as the background of open education in Japan and ACE project. We will also address student feedback and challenges for the localization of OER.

Presenters
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Tomo Nagashima

Tomo Nagashima

Instructional Designer, Hokkaido University / Creative Commons Japan


Thursday November 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:00am
Vancouver Island

8:30am

Saving are nice but learning is nicer: libraries linking open textbooks with instruction, pedagogy and assessment
We all know that the call for student savings and the textbook affordability crisis have catapulted OER and open textbooks into the spotlight. But that's not the only reason why they have such a valuable role to play in higher ed and libraries. While student savings are nice, student learning is nicer! This presentation will focus on the vital role open textbooks and OER can - and should - play in instruction and advancing pedagogical and curricular change.
Librarians are at the front lines of curriculum development, pedagogical innovation, and assessment of student learning. Locally, we cultivate and value our collaborations with partners in Teaching & Learning and IT, and many of us are members of curriculum committees, and other campus governance structures that focus on impacting student learning. At the national level, in 2013, the Association of College and Research Libraries published a white paper, "Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy: Creating Strategic Collaborations for a Changing Academic Environment," where the case was made for "strategic realignment for librarians in order for libraries to be resilient in the face of tremendous change in the scholarly information environment". At that time, the intersections reflected the ACRL Information Literacy Standards and focused on the economics of the distribution of scholarship, digital literacies, and libraries' changing roles. All three intersections emphasized the importance of innovations in teaching, publishing and content rights, and technology. There are many successful examples of librarians and faculty engaging on these topics.

Today, with the launch of the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and its emphasis on Threshold Concepts combined with the growing awareness and adoption of open educational content in higher ed we have even more opportunities for successful collaborations, particularly among scholarly communications and information literacy librarians. This presentation will make the case for how open textbooks and OER can foster collaboration between instruction librarians, scholarly communication librarians, and faculty in order to advance access to course content, improve student learning, and continue the crusade for saving students money on course content. Join us to discuss how pedagogy and assessment around open textbooks can be the key to: 1) deepening information literacy and scholarly communications awareness by including open educational content in library instruction sessions (and our captive audiences), and 2) engaging librarians and faculty in university-wide dialog about open educational content.

Presenters
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for Sarah Cohen

Sarah Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network


Thursday November 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:00am
Waddington Room

8:30am

Faculty and Student Collaboration for OER and Open Textbook Advocacy
What are the differing, yet possibly overlapping, roles of faculty and students in advocacy and support for OER? In this presentation we will share our ideas and experiences on this question.

Christina Hendricks is a faculty member at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver, who served as a Faculty Fellow with the BCcampus Open Textbook Program during 2014-2015. She will share her experiences with advocating for OER and open textbooks with faculty, and her ideas for continuing to do so in the future, especially on a campus where a recent policy about sharing teaching materials has led a number of faculty members to be unwilling to share theirs. One of the significant problems Christina has run into so far is that holding workshops about open education, OER, open textbooks and inviting people to come means only those already interested will do so. She will speak about, among other things, efforts to try to re-frame those workshops to focus on pedagogy and bring open education in as a means to improve pedagogy.

Brady Wallace is an undergraduate student at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, BC. Currently holding the position of Vice President University Relations on the Simon Fraser Student Society, he has been working for the past year with colleagues to encourage SFU faculty members to adopt OER's on campus. Through advocacy efforts both on and off campus, the 'BC Open Textbook Campaign' has garnered attention across the SFU community and reached other institutions within the Province. He will speak on the approaches used at SFU to get greater attention from all university stakeholders, what allies he has made within the university and the existing challenges in encouraging open textbook adoption.

Jenna Omassi and Daniel Munro are undergraduate students at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver, who serve as Vice-President, Academic and University Affairs and Associate Vice-President, Academic and University Affairs, respectively, for UBC's student union the Alma Mater Society. As of Spring 2015 they are starting to get involved in advocacy efforts around OER & open textbooks, and will be working more closely with Brady and Christina to plan activities starting in Fall 2015.

Though we can each speak to what we have done so far and/or hope to do, we will also focus on how students and faculty can work together in such efforts. While it can appear as if faculty have entire control over textbook decisions and students have little room for influence, students and faculty share many goals in regards to choices about course materials. Faculty would like students to access, read, interact with course materials, and many students would like to do so as well for the sake of their own learning, but are hindered by things such as cost, temporary access, inability to print or annotate digital files effectively, etc. The student perspective on the value of OER can be very effective in encouraging adoption, alongside that of faculty.

Presenters
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia-Vancouver
UBC, Philosophy, WordPress, OER
JO

Jenna Omassi

VP Academic & University Affairs, Alma Mater Society of UBC Vancouver
Vice-President Academic and University Affairs at Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia


Thursday November 19, 2015 8:30am - 9:00am
Boardroom

9:00am

A Review of Recent Research on the Efficacy and Perceptions of OER
This presentation reviews recent research on how faculty and students view OER. It also examines the influence of OER on student learning. Our purpose is three-fold:

1. Provide new information about recent research on OER adopted in higher education settings.

2. Provide some summary visuals of this research that could be utilized when trying to explain the value of OER to others

3. Provide information on how others can participate in further OER research.

Presenters
avatar for Lane Fischer

Lane Fischer

Department Chair, Counseling Psychology & Special Ed, BYU
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 19, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
BC Ballroom

9:00am

Educational Developers as Open Textbook Reps
There is a strong interest from student leaders and university administrators at the University of Saskatchewan in providing instructors and students with alternatives to existing (expensive) textbooks. However, currently there is no system in place to inform and educate instructors about the open options that are available. This has lead three educational developers from the teaching and learning centre to take on unofficial roles of "textbook reps." The educational developers had regularly heard about (and encountered) textbook representatives from publishers whom, regardless of price, pitch their textbooks as being the best-on-the-market for students. In response to these "sales calls," the educational developers took on the role of further advocating for open textbooks, open learning systems, and other open educational resources. This quickly turned into developing a collaborative partnership with the BCcampus's open textbook project and OpenStax in order to show-off and educate instructors about what open textbooks and other open resources have to offer.

This presentation will focus on our experiences of working with individual instructors and whole departments to raise awareness about open options, answering questions related to technology and pedagogy, and trying to convince these educators that they should give open educational resources a serious consideration. We will also discuss why and how others can fill this role at their own institutions.

Presenters
avatar for Heather M.  Ross

Heather M. Ross

Educational Developer (Digital Pedagogies), University of Saskatchewan


Thursday November 19, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
Vancouver Island

9:00am

Libraries as makers of OER, primary resources and educator engagement
The University of Oklahoma Libraries and the History of Science Collection have spent the last year planning Galileo's World, an exhibition showcasing the time period of Galileo through 300 rare books, hand-crafted instrument replicas, and companion digital resources in an exhibition without walls. The exhibition will have physical gallery spaces, as well as online exhibits and educational materials focused on the story of Galileo and his time period, especially emphasizing the creativity and interconnectedness of human achievement.

One of our primary methods of development has been the creation of open educational resources to support the exhibition and help develop the educational outreach of the History of Science Collections. In order to accomplish this we established the OU Academy of the Lynx, an education partner group, that has the creation of OER content as a fundamental goal. The OER materials include digital scans of primary resources, exhibition gallery guides, and educational activities. For the past 2 years, we have been working to engage K-20 faculty and students as not only consumers of OER, but as creators and re-mixers of this exhibition content.

This presentation will outline our multiple approaches to engaging the educational community as creators of OER content, both our successes and setbacks. We hope to spark a discussion of some of the many ways libraries and special collections can support the creation and adoption of OER built around our unique content.

Presenters
avatar for Brent Purkaple

Brent Purkaple

Educational Outreach Coordinator, University of Oklahoma Libraries


Thursday November 19, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
Waddington Room

9:00am

Faculty and Student Collaboration for OER and Open Textbook Advocacy
What are the differing, yet possibly overlapping, roles of faculty and students in advocacy and support for OER? In this presentation we will share our ideas and experiences on this question.

Christina Hendricks is a faculty member at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver, who served as a Faculty Fellow with the BCcampus Open Textbook Program during 2014-2015. She will share her experiences with advocating for OER and open textbooks with faculty, and her ideas for continuing to do so in the future, especially on a campus where a recent policy about sharing teaching materials has led a number of faculty members to be unwilling to share theirs. One of the significant problems Christina has run into so far is that holding workshops about open education, OER, open textbooks and inviting people to come means only those already interested will do so. She will speak about, among other things, efforts to try to re-frame those workshops to focus on pedagogy and bring open education in as a means to improve pedagogy.

Brady Wallace is an undergraduate student at Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, BC. Currently holding the position of Vice President University Relations on the Simon Fraser Student Society, he has been working for the past year with colleagues to encourage SFU faculty members to adopt OER's on campus. Through advocacy efforts both on and off campus, the 'BC Open Textbook Campaign' has garnered attention across the SFU community and reached other institutions within the Province. He will speak on the approaches used at SFU to get greater attention from all university stakeholders, what allies he has made within the university and the existing challenges in encouraging open textbook adoption.

Jenna Omassi and Daniel Munro are undergraduate students at the University of British Columbia-Vancouver, who serve as Vice-President, Academic and University Affairs and Associate Vice-President, Academic and University Affairs, respectively, for UBC's student union the Alma Mater Society. As of Spring 2015 they are starting to get involved in advocacy efforts around OER & open textbooks, and will be working more closely with Brady and Christina to plan activities starting in Fall 2015.

Though we can each speak to what we have done so far and/or hope to do, we will also focus on how students and faculty can work together in such efforts. While it can appear as if faculty have entire control over textbook decisions and students have little room for influence, students and faculty share many goals in regards to choices about course materials. Faculty would like students to access, read, interact with course materials, and many students would like to do so as well for the sake of their own learning, but are hindered by things such as cost, temporary access, inability to print or annotate digital files effectively, etc. The student perspective on the value of OER can be very effective in encouraging adoption, alongside that of faculty.

Presenters
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia-Vancouver
UBC, Philosophy, WordPress, OER
JO

Jenna Omassi

VP Academic & University Affairs, Alma Mater Society of UBC Vancouver
Vice-President Academic and University Affairs at Alma Mater Society, University of British Columbia


Thursday November 19, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
Boardroom

9:30am

Room Transfer
Thursday November 19, 2015 9:30am - 9:45am
On Your Own

9:45am

Researching OER in the open: Developments in the ROER4D project
Many promises have been made about the potential benefits of the adoption of open educational resources (OER) in development countries in particular. While there are a few empirical studies of OER adoption and impact in countries in the so-called Global South, most of these studies to date have been carried out in the Global North. The Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) project was established in late 2013 to contribute to a better understanding of OER adoption and impact in countries in South America, Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. This paper will reflect on the ROER4D project's commitment to open research processes, the benefits experienced and challenges faced whilst investigating the openness of OER.

The ROER4D project, funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC), the Open Society Foundations (OSF) and DFID was launched in August 2013 to undertake research on the adoption and impact of OER specifically in countries in the Global South. The project's main aim is to inform educational policy and practice in developing countries through its research findings on possible ways in which and under what circumstances OER may address the key educational challenges. There are 18 sub-projects under the ROER4D banner being undertaken in 26 countries across Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa and South America. Study sites are spread over 16 time-zones and the 86 researchers and research associates speak over 14 different languages between them. Sub-project activities are coordinated and supported by the ROER4D Network Hub, based at the University of Cape Town, South Africa and Wawasan Open University, Penang, Malaysia.

In keeping with the principle of openness, the ROER4D team committed themselves to follow emerging open research practices. From the contract level where researchers agreed to make their research data and documents openly available, through to the conceptual level of how various concepts are operationalised in questionnaires and interview schedules, to the practical level of creating identifiable, but anonymised, datasets, strategies needed to be created and procedures implemented to fulfil the ‘open research' intention. Benefits included early studies on our ‘open' processes undertaken by a separate research group and synergies between the ROER4D project and other OER research projects such as the OER Evidence Hub at the Open University. Some of the challenges emerged at the conceptual level and were complicated by the various languages into which questionnaires and interviews needed to be translated. Strategies adopted to make the ROER4D research open included a range of activities at the ROER4D Network Hub level as well as at the individual project level and were implemented with varying degrees of success. This presentation will reflect upon the initial intentions of open research by the ROER4D team and trace the emergence of a more comprehensive and more complex set of open research practices.

Presenters
avatar for Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams

Associate Professor, University of Cape Town
Research on OER in the Global South (ROER4D) project | Open Research | Open Data


Thursday November 19, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
BC Ballroom

9:45am

Adapting Open Stax Content at SLCC
Salt Lake Community College has a number of faculty piloting or fully adopting Open Stax textbooks. While the Open Stax textbooks are well-designed for the national market, our faculty have still had to do some significant work in adapting the texts to meet the needs of our students and courses. SLCC faculty from four disciplines (Biology, Sociology, Math, and History) will describe their work in adapting Open Stax content to meet the needs to our students. In some cases faculty have been faced with the challenge making the content fit with our courses. History, for instance, is radically reducing the size of the text and making tough decision about what to include and exclude. In other cases (particularly with Math) the challenges have been technical: while the content is open, the various formats do not necessarily lend themselves to adaptation. Finally, the faculty will discuss the pedagogical surprises revealed in the process of adapting open content. How has working with OER influenced their pedagogy? How has it invited them to reconsider the relationship between learning resources and their course? We hope the faculty have the opportunity to do short, informative presentations on their work followed by a robust discussion with the audience.

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, Rice University's OpenStax
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations for community colleges prior to joining OpenStax College. When not promoting Open Education Resources, Nicole fills her time attending lectures, spending time... Read More →
avatar for Jason Pickavance

Jason Pickavance

Director of Educational Initiatives, Salt Lake Community College
I'm currently Director of Educational Initiatives at Salt Lake Community College. My lead initiative is promoting open educational resources. I'm working on creating individual and structural incentives for the adoption of open content by faculty. I'm also pushing the College to think more broadly about open education in the community college context. Before taking becoming Director, I was an Associate Professor in the English Department where I... Read More →


Thursday November 19, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Vancouver Island

9:45am

SUNY Libraries and Open Educational Resources: Our Evolving Plan of Action
The State University of New York (SUNY) Libraries' collaborations with the instructional design community and teaching faculty to scale up OER creation and adoption across SUNY's sixty-five institutions represents a unique opportunity to facilitate OER impact across the state. In this presentation, "SUNY Open Educational Resources: An Evolving Plan of Action," participants will discover how several SUNY campus libraries are leading the way in developing a new service model (NSM) to proactively address the obstacles to OER adoption, position key stakeholders as developers of OERs and cement institutional support.

The proposed service model operationalizes the Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence's (COTE) faculty Course Supports model, where librarians, instructional designers and multimedia specialists provide faculty guidance through online course redesign. The NSM is an attempt to support faculty adoption of OER by removing some obstacles identified by teaching faculty as real and perceived roadblocks. The flexible NSM design offers coordinated supports for faculty in OER awareness, discovery, evaluation and use. The NSM also provides tools and supports to infuse assessment into OER content and demonstrate real impact on the system's goal to increase student completion and success. Additionally, the presenters will discuss their methods for local faculty OER adoption by aligning existing OER materials to the course learning outcomes, which bridge the formative assessments of learner's understanding of course content.

Secondly, we will focus on system libraries' support of the open educational resources community through development of new publishing models. Working with faculty and instructional designers to create and develop OER content, librarians are well-positioned to provide facilitation and support for course content design and creation. SUNY libraries collaborate on Open SUNY Textbooks, producing eight textbooks in 2013-14 and another fifteen in 2015. This new model of collaboration depends on the librarian-instructional designer-faculty interaction, where the library works hand-in-hand with the author and instructional designer to publish free and affordable textbooks tied to course content and learning outcomes.

The third part of the presentation will focus on the adopted resolution, A Rationale for a SUNY Strategy for the Future of Academic Publishing, by the SUNY University Faculty Senate (USF), comprised of faculty from SUNY institutions. The resolution recommends, “The University Faculty Senate USF) encourages SUNY, its Libraries,and the Faculty to explore and support alternatives to publishing scholarship with commercial publishers. The resolution further recommends the Executive Committee of the University Faculty Senate work with the SUNY Provost, the SUNY Librarians Association, the SUNY Council of Library Directors, and other stakeholders to create a task force for exploring alternative models of scholarly publishing

Presenters
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Director of Libraries, Monroe Community College


Thursday November 19, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Waddington Room

9:45am

Developing an OER Campus Action Plan
Whether you are a seasoned open education advocate or a newcomer to the movement, planning successful a campus-wide initiative to expand OER adoption can be challenging. This session will provide a crash course on advocacy campaign planning to develop and strengthen campus-based OER initiatives, drawing on the experience of successful case studies and the expertise of the two veteran grassroots organizers leading the session. Topics will include stakeholder engagement, strategy development, messaging and communication, and awareness raising, with emphasis on the important role that students play in leading the charge. During the session, participants will start working on their own action plans, and walk away with a template to bring back to campus.

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e



Thursday November 19, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Boardroom

10:15am

Faculty attitudes towards OER and open textbooks in British Columbia and beyond
In early 2015, Rajiv Jhangiani, Jessie Key, Christina Hendricks, Beck Pitt from the OER Research Hub (http://oerresearchhub.org), and Clint Lalonde from BCcampus (http://bccampus.ca/) surveyed faculty in British Columbia (and beyond) on their use of and attitudes towards open textbooks and other open educational resources. In particular, the questionnaire focused on faculty adoption of open textbooks created as part of the BCcampus Open Textbooks project (http://bccampus.ca/open-textbook-project/) which is in the process of creating a library of open textbooks across 36 subject areas. To date the project has involved 14 institutions, saved students an estimated $476,400-$713,921 (CAD) and seen over 140 adoptions of the textbooks across the province (see: http://open.bccampus.ca/)

On the survey we asked faculty a range of questions, including:

- whether and how they have used and/or created OER and open textbooks, and their experiences with doing so

- the challenges they face most often with using OER

- which factors would make them most likely to choose a particular open educational resource over another

- their perception of the impact of using OER, for students and for themselves as teachers

- institutional or other policies that affect their use and/or creation of OER

Headline findings include:

- Participants who were more open to experience were more likely to have adapted and/or created OER

- The top reasons cited for using OER (those given by 50% or more of respondents were (in order starting with most cited)

- - for ideas and inspiration

- - to supplement existing coursework

- - to prepare for teaching

- - to broaden the range of resources available to learners

- - 58% of respondents have difficulty finding suitable resources in their subject area

- - 39% of respondents do not have enough time to look for suitable resources

- - 58% have used OER, 33% have adapted OER, and 25% have created OER

We have also done analyses breaking down such findings according to type of institution (e.g., those that focus heavily on research versus those that do not), years of teaching experience, full-time versus part-time employment status, and more.

In this presentation we will report these and other findings from the survey, within the context of respondents from different institutional environments and other data about faculty attitudes about OER from the OER Research Hub.

Presenters
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia-Vancouver
UBC, Philosophy, WordPress, OER
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am the Open Studies Teaching Fellow and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. I have revised two open textbooks—for... Read More →
avatar for Clint Lalonde

Clint Lalonde

Manager, Educational Technology, BCcampus
Clint Lalonde is an educational technologist and an advocate for the use of open educational resources and open education practices in higher education. Clint has worked in the British Columbia post-secondary system for 20 years, and is currently Manager, Education Technology at BCcampus.
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Thursday November 19, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
BC Ballroom

10:15am

Adapting Open Stax Content at SLCC
Salt Lake Community College has a number of faculty piloting or fully adopting Open Stax textbooks. While the Open Stax textbooks are well-designed for the national market, our faculty have still had to do some significant work in adapting the texts to meet the needs of our students and courses. SLCC faculty from four disciplines (Biology, Sociology, Math, and History) will describe their work in adapting Open Stax content to meet the needs to our students. In some cases faculty have been faced with the challenge making the content fit with our courses. History, for instance, is radically reducing the size of the text and making tough decision about what to include and exclude. In other cases (particularly with Math) the challenges have been technical: while the content is open, the various formats do not necessarily lend themselves to adaptation. Finally, the faculty will discuss the pedagogical surprises revealed in the process of adapting open content. How has working with OER influenced their pedagogy? How has it invited them to reconsider the relationship between learning resources and their course? We hope the faculty have the opportunity to do short, informative presentations on their work followed by a robust discussion with the audience.

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, Rice University's OpenStax
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations for community colleges prior to joining OpenStax College. When not promoting Open Education Resources, Nicole fills her time attending lectures, spending time... Read More →
avatar for Jason Pickavance

Jason Pickavance

Director of Educational Initiatives, Salt Lake Community College
I'm currently Director of Educational Initiatives at Salt Lake Community College. My lead initiative is promoting open educational resources. I'm working on creating individual and structural incentives for the adoption of open content by faculty. I'm also pushing the College to think more broadly about open education in the community college context. Before taking becoming Director, I was an Associate Professor in the English Department where I... Read More →


Thursday November 19, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Vancouver Island

10:15am

SUNY Libraries and Open Educational Resources: Our Evolving Plan of Action
The State University of New York (SUNY) Libraries' collaborations with the instructional design community and teaching faculty to scale up OER creation and adoption across SUNY's sixty-five institutions represents a unique opportunity to facilitate OER impact across the state. In this presentation, "SUNY Open Educational Resources: An Evolving Plan of Action," participants will discover how several SUNY campus libraries are leading the way in developing a new service model (NSM) to proactively address the obstacles to OER adoption, position key stakeholders as developers of OERs and cement institutional support.

The proposed service model operationalizes the Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence's (COTE) faculty Course Supports model, where librarians, instructional designers and multimedia specialists provide faculty guidance through online course redesign. The NSM is an attempt to support faculty adoption of OER by removing some obstacles identified by teaching faculty as real and perceived roadblocks. The flexible NSM design offers coordinated supports for faculty in OER awareness, discovery, evaluation and use. The NSM also provides tools and supports to infuse assessment into OER content and demonstrate real impact on the system's goal to increase student completion and success. Additionally, the presenters will discuss their methods for local faculty OER adoption by aligning existing OER materials to the course learning outcomes, which bridge the formative assessments of learner's understanding of course content.

Secondly, we will focus on system libraries' support of the open educational resources community through development of new publishing models. Working with faculty and instructional designers to create and develop OER content, librarians are well-positioned to provide facilitation and support for course content design and creation. SUNY libraries collaborate on Open SUNY Textbooks, producing eight textbooks in 2013-14 and another fifteen in 2015. This new model of collaboration depends on the librarian-instructional designer-faculty interaction, where the library works hand-in-hand with the author and instructional designer to publish free and affordable textbooks tied to course content and learning outcomes.

The third part of the presentation will focus on the adopted resolution, A Rationale for a SUNY Strategy for the Future of Academic Publishing, by the SUNY University Faculty Senate (USF), comprised of faculty from SUNY institutions. The resolution recommends, “The University Faculty Senate USF) encourages SUNY, its Libraries,and the Faculty to explore and support alternatives to publishing scholarship with commercial publishers. The resolution further recommends the Executive Committee of the University Faculty Senate work with the SUNY Provost, the SUNY Librarians Association, the SUNY Council of Library Directors, and other stakeholders to create a task force for exploring alternative models of scholarly publishing

Presenters
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Director of Libraries, Monroe Community College


Thursday November 19, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Waddington Room

10:15am

Creation and Adoption of OER: A sustainable statewide model
This presentation will outline a model for districts and other organizations to collaborate on the creation and adoption of OER as well as professional development and teacher support.

In 2013, Minnesota's new Social Studies standards were approved. Districts needed all new curriculum for a 6th grade MN Studies course; a few of them opted to develop one themselves and the MN Partnership for Collaborative Curriculum was born. The MPCC now has over 200 districts in the state as members and we are developing 40 courses in all core content areas from grades 3-12 that will be CC licensed. The MPCC is funded by it's members to provide for new courses, content revisions and updates as well as professional development for writers and implementing teachers. There is a sustainable model in place that will allow us to move beyond the initial scope of this project and start developing electives and forming additional partnerships.

Content is gathered from existing OER, developed by course authors, partners around the state the generate educational materials such as the MN Humanities Center and from other permissioned sources such as the Southern Poverty Law Center. Courses are piloted and revised by member organizations before being made available as OER.
The transparency and flexibility of the materials are what has made this program a success. Materials are accessible in multiple learning management systems and on multiple devices. The format of the materials also allows for teachers to adopt an entire course or to pull individual units or lessons into existing course materials. We train our course authors on topics like: Mindset; Equity & Diversity; Copyright; Technical Requirements; Accessibility and Curriculum Design.

Presenters
avatar for Jon Fila

Jon Fila

Curriculum Coordinator, Intermediate District 287
Curriculum Coordinator for ISD 287, OER, digital curriculum resources and professional development in blended, digital, and just-in-time teaching. Curriculum developer, trainer and support for the MN Partnership for Collaborative Curriculum. Teaches English 12 online for Northern Star Online.


Thursday November 19, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Boardroom

10:45am

Break
Coffee & tea provided

Thursday November 19, 2015 10:45am - 11:00am
On Your Own

11:00am

The Portable Z: How Virginia is Scaling the Z-Degree Across Its 23 Colleges with the Zx23 Project

One advantage of a centralized statewide postsecondary system that shares core infrastructure, policy-making, and governance among diverse institutions is that often, promising innovations are able to scale more easily, and more quickly, than in decentralized systems. The Virginia Community College System (VCCS) has just this sort of centralized structure, which is enabling the widespread adoption and use of open educational resources (OER) across the system. Three years ago, only a small fraction of VCCS faculty had heard of OER, with far fewer using open materials in their courses. Today, with support from System Office grants, professional development funds, and local college monies, Virginia's colleges have helped develop over 70 new open courses, with many of these courses being adopted by entire college departments. Led by the pioneering work of Tidewater and Northern Virginia Community Colleges, Virginia already boasts three all-OER associate degrees, or Z-Degrees. Collectively these efforts have not only saved Virginia college students millions of dollars in textbook costs but have increased their chances of academic success.


In April 2015, The William & Flora Hewlett Foundation awarded the VCCS a grant to help fund the Zx23 Project. The long-term goal of the Zx23 Project is to identify what factors make a Z-Degree portable from one community college to another in order to eventually scale the model to all 23 Virginia community colleges. To that end, the grant from Hewlett is helping the VCCS to accomplish three initial objectives: (1) Adopt, adapt, and pilot Z-Degree courses across VCCS colleges, (2) establish models for sustaining and supporting future OER infrastructure, and (3) create a "roadmap" to be used by other institutions interested in scaling and sustaining a statewide or system OER infrastructure.


A cohort of sixteen VCCS colleges began work on the Zx23 Project in Summer 2015, with project faculty currently piloting new Z-Degree courses in September and planning courses for the Spring 2016 semester. Lumen Learning, an integral partner in the project, has been working closely with participating colleges to help build degree pathways and common OER practices and infrastructure, and to evaluate the outcomes of the pilots.


The goal of this session is to provide a valuable, on-the-ground report of the early results of this ambitious effort midway through its first year, as well as stimulate conversation and ideas about the project from the broader OER community.

Presenters

Thursday November 19, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Vancouver Island

11:00am

A Tale of Two OERu Courses: Investigating Pathways to Formal Credentialling
Thompson Rivers University (TRU) in Kamloops, BC, Canada is a Founding Anchor Partner of the Open Educational Resource universitas (OERu) which is a virtual collaboration of like-minded institutions with a philanthropic mission to provide high-quality, accessible and affordable online education to students worldwide. Unlike many current MOOC providers, OERu aims to provide flexible pathways for OER learners to gain formal academic credit after successfully completing an OERu course. It is hoped that interested OERu students all over the world, who may not be able to access traditional educational opportunities for a variety of reasons, will be able to take courses for general interest or to gain credible credentials from participating OERu institutions. Assessment and credentialing services which ensure equivalence and high regard for qualifications gained from OERu are provided by participating institutions on a cost-recovery basis, or may be funded through other organizations.

TRU has pledged to contribute two open OER-based online courses towards the OERu's course offerings. ART 100: Art Appreciation and Techniques (a repurposed course which was one of the OERu prototypes) is TRU's first course offering to OERu and PSYC 2111: Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (which uses an open BC Campus textbook) is TRU's second course offering. This presentation describes some of the discussions and steps taken while formulating two possible models to allow OERu students to receive TRU credits after successful completion of these two open courses. The role of TRU's Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) Department and TRU's credit transfer and challenge exam protocols are described. The considerations informing an affordable fee structure for assessment services for financially disadvantaged learners all over the world will also be described. The presentation also outlines the role of faculty and other internal institutional champions in advocating for and supporting OER adoption and creation at an institution.

Presenters
avatar for Gail Morong

Gail Morong

Instructional designer, Thompson Rivers University
Gail has been an educator for over 33 years with experience in learning design, curriculum development and delivery, distance education and online learning, open educational resources, undergraduate and graduate collaborative program design, educational technology and educational leadership.


Thursday November 19, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
BC Ballroom

11:00am

Library strategies for sustainable open education adoption and publishing
Library roles, services, and strategies are crucial to the growth of Open Education, as they move from pilots to sustainable programs, libraries are facing important decisions about resource reallocation and cooperation. Sharing successful strategies and sustainability plans are key next steps for the role of libraries.

Panel of librarians share a variety of successful roles and services that support open education, and answer strategies to make their programs more sustainable.

What services or initiatives have made an impact?

How is that impact measured?

What plans do they have to make the programs and services more sustainable?

Join us in a presentation that ends with an opportunity for audience participation in a discussion and potential for collaborative strategies.

Presenters
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

University Library Dean, Humboldt State University
Just launched Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/ | | Special Collections Librarian and Library Student Scholar Interns are working on very exciting publishing and digital scholarship projects.


Thursday November 19, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Waddington Room

11:00am

RIP, Print - Well, not so fast!
Survey data shows that students and faculty want OER print options. Join us to discuss what the latest student and faculty survey data says about digital and print formats, national sales data on OER print materials, the role of print in OER initiatives, and what platforms and approaches exist to create affordable and sustainable models for delivering print options for students and faculty to meet their specific learning styles and needs.

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, Rice University's OpenStax
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations for community colleges prior to joining OpenStax College. When not promoting Open Education Resources, Nicole fills her time attending lectures, spending time... Read More →
avatar for Richard Hershman

Richard Hershman

Vice President of Government Relations, National Association of College Stores


Thursday November 19, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Boardroom

11:30am

The Portable Z: How Virginia is Scaling the Z-Degree Across Its 23 Colleges with the Zx23 Project

One advantage of a centralized statewide postsecondary system that shares core infrastructure, policy-making, and governance among diverse institutions is that often, promising innovations are able to scale more easily, and more quickly, than in decentralized systems. The Virginia Community College System (VCCS) has just this sort of centralized structure, which is enabling the widespread adoption and use of open educational resources (OER) across the system. Three years ago, only a small fraction of VCCS faculty had heard of OER, with far fewer using open materials in their courses. Today, with support from System Office grants, professional development funds, and local college monies, Virginia's colleges have helped develop over 70 new open courses, with many of these courses being adopted by entire college departments. Led by the pioneering work of Tidewater and Northern Virginia Community Colleges, Virginia already boasts three all-OER associate degrees, or Z-Degrees. Collectively these efforts have not only saved Virginia college students millions of dollars in textbook costs but have increased their chances of academic success.


In April 2015, The William & Flora Hewlett Foundation awarded the VCCS a grant to help fund the Zx23 Project. The long-term goal of the Zx23 Project is to identify what factors make a Z-Degree portable from one community college to another in order to eventually scale the model to all 23 Virginia community colleges. To that end, the grant from Hewlett is helping the VCCS to accomplish three initial objectives: (1) Adopt, adapt, and pilot Z-Degree courses across VCCS colleges, (2) establish models for sustaining and supporting future OER infrastructure, and (3) create a "roadmap" to be used by other institutions interested in scaling and sustaining a statewide or system OER infrastructure.


A cohort of sixteen VCCS colleges began work on the Zx23 Project in Summer 2015, with project faculty currently piloting new Z-Degree courses in September and planning courses for the Spring 2016 semester. Lumen Learning, an integral partner in the project, has been working closely with participating colleges to help build degree pathways and common OER practices and infrastructure, and to evaluate the outcomes of the pilots.


The goal of this session is to provide a valuable, on-the-ground report of the early results of this ambitious effort midway through its first year, as well as stimulate conversation and ideas about the project from the broader OER community.

Presenters

Thursday November 19, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Vancouver Island

11:30am

The OER Revolution in Geospatial Technology
A brand new series of geographic science and geospatial technology (remote sensing, GIS, and GPS) curriculum is now freely available for educators. Based on the National Council for Geographic Education's (NCGE) Geography for Life standards and the Department of Labor's (DOL) Geospatial Technology Competency Model (GTCM), these new courses incorporate the latest in geographic science, geospatial technology, and cognitive learning theory. The material includes the eTextbooks and activities using ESRI's ArcGIS 10.3 desktop software necessary to meet the knowledge, skill sets, and competencies needed in the geospatial technology industry, as outlined by the GTCM. The courses are licensed for retaining, reusing, revising, remixing, and redistributing under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

This presentation will focus on the curriculum design of the courses and the various modalities it could be utilized including online, hybrid, and flipped classroom pedagogy. This work was funded jointly by Lumen Learning's Kaleidoscope Project, NSF (National GeoTech Center), and the DOL (NISGTC).

Presenters
avatar for Adam Dastrup, GISP

Adam Dastrup, GISP

Associate Professor, Salt Lake Community College


Thursday November 19, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
BC Ballroom

11:30am

Library strategies for sustainable open education adoption and publishing
Library roles, services, and strategies are crucial to the growth of Open Education, as they move from pilots to sustainable programs, libraries are facing important decisions about resource reallocation and cooperation. Sharing successful strategies and sustainability plans are key next steps for the role of libraries.

Panel of librarians share a variety of successful roles and services that support open education, and answer strategies to make their programs more sustainable.

What services or initiatives have made an impact?

How is that impact measured?

What plans do they have to make the programs and services more sustainable?

Join us in a presentation that ends with an opportunity for audience participation in a discussion and potential for collaborative strategies.

Presenters
MB

Marilyn Billings

Scholarly Communication & Special Initiatives Libr, University of Massachusetts Amherst
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

University Library Dean, Humboldt State University
Just launched Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/ | | Special Collections Librarian and Library Student Scholar Interns are working on very exciting publishing and digital scholarship projects.


Thursday November 19, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Waddington Room

11:30am

The Open Strategy of TU Delft
Since 2007 Delft University of Technology is involved with Open Education. We started with publishing the course materials of our campus courses to our OpenCourseWare website. In 2010 we started with iTunesU and in 2012 we joined the MOOC movement with joining the EdX Consortium.

In 2014 this has lead to the start of the TU Delft Extension School for Open and Online Education. As a traditional brick-and-mortar university we are moving into the world of online education, but we are not forgetting our open roots.

Open Licensing

One of the pillars of our long-term strategy is that we have a strong commitment to ‘open'. This entails that we license our course materials with an open license (CC-BY-SA-NC) to enable reuse of TU Delft course materials by others and thus increasing accessibility to Higher Education, answering the worldwide demand for education. This is also the default license for the course content of our MOOCs. We publish the videos and other learning materials under the same open license (CC-BY-SA-NC) to make it available to learners all over the world. Off course there can be exceptions due to copyright and privacy restrictions for some course materials.

Because we also have to come to a financially sustainable business model for our open & online education (we have to cover our costs), we use the Non-commercial clause. We do not uphold this condition to prevent re-use. We do this to make sure we can protect the quality and prevent (intended) misuse of our content. This means that institutions that want to charge money to their students for the access to our course materials have to ask TU Delft for permission and get a license agreement.

The NC-license gives us the opportunity to also sublicense our MOOCs to third parties, such as the Arabic platform EdRaak and Chinese platform XuatangX. Both organisations are aiming for increasing the reach/accessibility of Higher Education to regions with little access to high quality university education. Central to our licensing policy is that the course materials such as videos & texts remain freely accessible to all, while additional services for education, teaching efforts and certification can be licensed for a fee.

Business Model
Early on we have recognised that if you only consider MOOCs there is no sustainable business model for a university. This is why we broadened our scope and consider our open education activities as part of our funnel towards paying (online) students.

From the production side, we will develop the content once and reuse the content in different courses for different target groups, such as a MOOC, online course, blended course on campus and publish the content on OpenCourseWare.

The first signals we have indicate that this model is working. For example 0,1% of our MOOC students applies for a master programme on campus.

We are also investigating new business models, such as sublicensing of MOOCs to other universities and platforms.

Presenters
avatar for Willem van Valkenburg

Willem van Valkenburg

Boardmember Open Education Consortium, Delft University of Technology
Responsible for the production and delivery of all the Open, Online and Blended Courses of TU Delft. This includes OpenCourseWare, MOOCs, ProfEd, Online MSc and blended courses. | I'm also Board member of the Open Education Consortium.


Thursday November 19, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Boardroom

12:00pm

Lunch (On Your Own)
Thursday and Friday, we have left lunch open for you to explore the food trucks and restaurants of downtown Vancouver. Street Food Vancouver has an excellent website and mobile apps (Apple | Android | Windows) to help make finding lunch easier.

Thursday November 19, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
On Your Own

1:00pm

The Open Textbook Network: a vision for libraries working together to advance open textbooks
During our three years of experience with open textbooks at the University of Minnesota, we discovered several reasons why faculty don't adopt open textbooks. While the barriers might appear to be small, they are significant enough to stop faculty members from making the change. These barriers include:

* Faculty don't fully understand how financial stress impacts students academically.

* Faculty aren't aware that open textbooks are an option.

* Faculty don't know what open textbooks are or confuse them with electronic textbooks.

* Faculty don't know where to find open textbooks.

* Faculty are skeptical of the quality of open textbooks.

With the support of the Hewlett Foundation and the University of Minnesota Libraries, we were able to develop and deploy solutions and strategies to help faculty overcome these barriers. The Open Textbook Library, now hosting upwards of 175 complete open textbook titles, has built these titles' credibility and increased faculty exposure to open textbooks by incentivizing textbook reviews by faculty from institutions across the country.

Libraries have been at the core of our outreach and are our most integral partners in reaching faculty and building capacity on campuses for open textbooks. At the invitation of our partner libraries, we've visited dozens of schools to seed and support their open education programs. As a result, our partner institutions' data shows that nearly 40% of their faculty attendees adopt an open textbook. This small pilot group of faculty has saved students nearly $410,000 in textbook costs in less than three years. It took outreach, education, conversations, and strategies to engage faculty with the textbooks. And it works.

Today, libraries are developing programming to support OER and open textbooks at a dizzying rate. While workshops have shown to be successful, workshops alone are not enough. What is the next step for the Open Textbook Initiative and what can our growing community of faculty and libraries who visit the Open Textbook Library expect in the coming months? Enter the Open Textbook Network.

The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is a consortium of institutions working to:

* help faculty overcome barriers to adoption of open textbooks

* increase institutional capacity to support faculty adoption and use of open textbooks

* collaboratively develop new understandings and best practices of open textbook adoption and use.

This presentation will introduce attendees to the Open Textbook Network and present a vision for its future. Librarians from the OTN schools in attendance at OpenEd15 will share stories from their institutions of how open textbook programming supported their program development. The panel will also discuss the benefit a network-approach to open education has made on their campuses. Join us to hear these perspectives on the value of libraries working together to increase awareness and adoptions of open textbooks, demonstrate impact, and ultimately advance learning.

Presenters
avatar for Sarah Cohen

Sarah Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →


Thursday November 19, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Waddington Room

1:00pm

The Economics of Open
Today the development, sustaining and support of open educational resources are funded by institutions, private foundations, consortia, non-profits and commercial entities. Never has the open economic ecosystem been as healthy and diverse. Still, many of the economics models are not explicitly understood and are fairly unproven. This session will explore the funding sources and models supporting OER, map those to traditional models for sustaining and enhancing educational materials, and identify both the opportunities and risks in the current models.

Presenters
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning


Thursday November 19, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Boardroom

1:30pm

Making Online Education Accessible to the 6 billion people without laptops or broadband
While online education has been transforming the field of education in recent years, the lack of access to such resources in many parts of the world has received relatively little attention. In this presentation, we examine the lack of infrastructure in the developing world for accessing video-based online learning, showing that there does exist a large infrastructure gap in broadband connectivity that will prevent online video-based education from reaching more than a small percentage of the worlds population for decades. We analyze the potential of mobile devices and mobile broadband as channels to provide access to a larger audience, noting that the large file size of video is a key barrier preventing video-based online learning from reaching the mobile-connected users. Finally, we present a potential a software based solution: "e-lessons" - files which provide a 20-30 minute long Khan Academy-like learning experience offline and on mobile phones in less than 5 megabytes, demo the technology, and outline the technologies used to achieve this.


Thursday November 19, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
BC Ballroom

1:30pm

OER User Groups for K-12 Educators
K-12 educators using OER rarely have the chance to connect with others outside of their district to discuss OER. This session will explore an attempt to create regional communities of OER practitioners.

School districts across Washington state are beginning to use OER as part of their instructional material strategies. In order to help school districts address shared implementation considerations, the Washington Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) is facilitating the development of OER User Groups focused on a particular open curriculum or content area.

User groups are a way for district curriculum, technology, and administration leaders across the state to convene both online and in person to address issues such as:

* maintaining fidelity of implementation with highly adaptable resources

* addressing equity of access with various OER distribution platforms

* understanding how OER fit into instructional materials approval and adoption pathways and how they encourage a paradigm shift from the traditional adoption cycle

* meeting professional development needs

* sharing teacher created materials to support implementation and understanding open licensing for those materials

* measuring the efficacy of an open curriculum and sharing those findings with other districts

OSPI, in partnership with Washington state educational service districts, assembled a statewide task force to create a vision and collaboratively design and develop the structure and management of the first OER User's Group, focused on the EngageNY mathematics instructional materials. Additional OER User Groups will address other content areas. These support systems will allow for rich cross-district discussion about the nuts and bolts of using OER as core instructional material in the classroom.

Presenters
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.


Thursday November 19, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Vancouver Island

1:30pm

The Open Textbook Network: a vision for libraries working together to advance open textbooks
During our three years of experience with open textbooks at the University of Minnesota, we discovered several reasons why faculty don't adopt open textbooks. While the barriers might appear to be small, they are significant enough to stop faculty members from making the change. These barriers include:

* Faculty don't fully understand how financial stress impacts students academically.

* Faculty aren't aware that open textbooks are an option.

* Faculty don't know what open textbooks are or confuse them with electronic textbooks.

* Faculty don't know where to find open textbooks.

* Faculty are skeptical of the quality of open textbooks.

With the support of the Hewlett Foundation and the University of Minnesota Libraries, we were able to develop and deploy solutions and strategies to help faculty overcome these barriers. The Open Textbook Library, now hosting upwards of 175 complete open textbook titles, has built these titles' credibility and increased faculty exposure to open textbooks by incentivizing textbook reviews by faculty from institutions across the country.

Libraries have been at the core of our outreach and are our most integral partners in reaching faculty and building capacity on campuses for open textbooks. At the invitation of our partner libraries, we've visited dozens of schools to seed and support their open education programs. As a result, our partner institutions' data shows that nearly 40% of their faculty attendees adopt an open textbook. This small pilot group of faculty has saved students nearly $410,000 in textbook costs in less than three years. It took outreach, education, conversations, and strategies to engage faculty with the textbooks. And it works.

Today, libraries are developing programming to support OER and open textbooks at a dizzying rate. While workshops have shown to be successful, workshops alone are not enough. What is the next step for the Open Textbook Initiative and what can our growing community of faculty and libraries who visit the Open Textbook Library expect in the coming months? Enter the Open Textbook Network.

The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is a consortium of institutions working to:

* help faculty overcome barriers to adoption of open textbooks

* increase institutional capacity to support faculty adoption and use of open textbooks

* collaboratively develop new understandings and best practices of open textbook adoption and use.

This presentation will introduce attendees to the Open Textbook Network and present a vision for its future. Librarians from the OTN schools in attendance at OpenEd15 will share stories from their institutions of how open textbook programming supported their program development. The panel will also discuss the benefit a network-approach to open education has made on their campuses. Join us to hear these perspectives on the value of libraries working together to increase awareness and adoptions of open textbooks, demonstrate impact, and ultimately advance learning.

Presenters
avatar for Sarah Cohen

Sarah Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network
avatar for David Ernst

David Ernst

Executive Director, Open Textbook Network
Dr. David Ernst is graduate faculty, Chief Information Officer, and Director of the Center for Open Education in the College of Education and Human Development at the University of Minnesota. David is also the Executive Director of the Open Textbook Network, which works to improve higher education access, affordability, and academic success for all students through the use of open textbooks. David created and manages the Open Textbook Library... Read More →


Thursday November 19, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Waddington Room

1:30pm

Implementing the Full Stack of Open Education: Content, Licensing, Technology, People, and Vision
The student, faculty, and staff member's capacity to share and give is deeply "grounded in the human attributes of creativity and desire, so that students can recognise themselves in a world of their own design" (Neary, 2009). The University of British Columbia's Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) responds to this desire by supporting a wide range of open education efforts, from OER creation and MOOCs to Wikipedia projects and community sharing.

This presentation will attempt to bridge the too often divided "pro" or "against" camps of corporate MOOCs, LMSs, OER, and open technologies. It will explore the philosophy of successful open education projects and share practical advices of aligning vision, technology, people's skills and managerial practices to create an all-inclusive foundation for creating an unrestricted knowledge available for variety of usages.

UBC utilizes both third party technologies (edX, Blackboard) which are aligned with it's own self-hosted open source platforms. More than a collection of resources, the UBC Wiki, UBC CMS and UBC Blogs serve as a collaborative authoring and education platform for content that is republished on diverse sites across and beyond the institution. This process challenges previously locked-down university content management systems and processes, and empowers faculty, students, and staff to edit and share content to benefit the entire campus community in number of creative ways. The open and collaborative ethos has allowed users across the institution to frequently drive innovation, such as a Math Department initiative that constructs and reassembles learning resources using a flexible and powerful content model that exploits namespaces, transclusions, and categories and delivers content to smartphone apps. By practical application of this all-inclusive approach and philosophy, UBC has managed to impact not only its teaching and learning environment in very positive way but also improved website production and saved significant amounts of money that could be redirected towards teaching, learning, and research.

In addition to content and technology, management vision is important and often overlooked ingredient for a successful and widely adopted implementation of open learning. Confident managers at higher education institutions are willing to cede a measure of control in order to gain empowerment of their institution's people. This presentation will explore how open technologies, institutional vision, and managerial roles can empower the people (including students, staff, and faculty) to create, adopt, and share educational materials and practices.

Presenters
avatar for Novak Rogic

Novak Rogic

Web Strategy Manager, CTLT - UBC
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rogic


Thursday November 19, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Boardroom

2:00pm

Break
Coffee & tea provided

Thursday November 19, 2015 2:00pm - 2:15pm
On Your Own

2:15pm

Collateral Learning: Breaking Predictive Online Learning
A Multimedia Online Learning Immersive Environment (M.O.L.I.E.) course can scaffold and support the seamless integration of content (goals, aims, objectives, digital literacies) within a compelling narrative built on an open infrastructure. This innovative open online learning model showcases efforts at University of Mary Washington and Michigan State University, to support the development and use of a dynamic learning alternative; APIs to bridge Canvas and open source Wordpress, inclusion of open learning resources, embedded librarian, and integration of multimedia resources. These elements are not new and have often been used in isolation crafting a passive learning experience. What M.O.L.I.E. brings is an open and immersive learning experience designed to create convergence among these elements for a dynamic and responsive learning experience - placing learners as active constructors of knowledge.

M.O.L.I.E. sits at the crossroads of collateral learning, creating course synergy around gameplay (choice, quests, role-playing, collaboration), opportunities for reflection, and tapping into the power of storytelling while drawing upon open source tools and materials forging new pathways to energize learners and breakthrough predictive online learning pedagogy.

M.O.L.I.E.'s design draws heavily on a collaborative team approach. Learning Design teams draw upon their individual and collective imaginations, disciplinary expertise, and explore the role of transmedia to foster and challenge us to create compelling and open immersive learning experiences. The existence of M.O.L.I.E. on the open web points the way to 'what is possible' and inspire others to use, remix, and integrate open course resources as we collectively build a new legacy of what is possible on the Open Web.

Our Panel Session shares three projects (Canvas Meets M.O.L.I.E. and the Open Web, In the Beginning: The M.O.L.I.E. Team, and M.O.L.I.E. Matters - Faculty Development Through Immersion) and highlights core features and learning/development processes and integration of open resources and tools. It is time to create EPIC learning experiences that tap into our collective curiosity, promote active engagement and create a 'sense of wonder' around learning!

Presenters
avatar for Mary Kayler

Mary Kayler

Director, CTE&I, University of Mary Washington


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
BC Ballroom

2:15pm

Open Pedagogy, Information Competency, Student Engagement: The Pierce Open Pathway
Pierce College is developing a zero-textbook cost degree because it makes sense to help us meet a variety of our strategic goals. However, one of the biggest reasons why our college believes in open is because we know that OER provides flexibility that can lead to newer and more engaging educational practice. The Pierce Open Pathway project is part professional development, part course design, part student engagement, and part faculty collaboration project. The overall goal of our project is enhanced teaching practice through thoughtful course design and lowered student costs.

Participants will: Explore the Pierce Open Pathway project goals, interact with the Pierce open education course rubric, hear from faculty and students who support the project, and collect the professional development materials that Pierce College has created as part of our open education initiative.

Presenters
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Vancouver Island

2:15pm

OPENPediatrics: Using Open Education to Improve Pediatric Care Worldwide
Despite the advent of open education and its adoption in many higher education fields, medicine has been slow to embrace these trends.

OPENPediatrics seeks to address the current, dramatic inequalities in pediatric medical knowledge and healthcare that exist across the globe. Despite the significant medical advances of the 21st century, there is a great geographic inequality to access in health services and trained personnel: over one billion people worldwide lack access to health services or trained health workers. Expertise on how to treat these children exists. Yet the teaching hospital apprenticeship model that once revolutionized medical education is now failing to keep pace with the dramatic increase in both medical knowledge and the increasing interconnected global population. As a result, expert knowledge is bottlenecked within institutions and only accessible to the few learners with the means and opportunities to come within the walls. Post-graduate medical education is further disrupted by work hour restrictions for trainees, which decrease opportunities for experiential learning.

OPENPediatrics provides a model for the future direction of medical education, by combining the latest innovative technologies and advancements in open education with virtual simulation, online gaming and adult learning theory to provide continuing medical education and connect the global pediatric healthcare community as never before.

OPENPediatrics has created an interactive virtual training and knowledge exchange platform to enhance the quality of pediatric critical care and revolutionize the existing post-graduate medical education model. Designed by experienced physicians at Boston Children's Hospital, in collaboration with technology partners, OPENPediatrics is changing the existing medical educational paradigm by offering asynchronous interactive learning and various avenues for knowledge sharing outside the walls of select institutions. Those accessing the website or the online platform will find free access to academically rigorous and peer-reviewed lectures, simulators, and protocols. Using these materials to encourage active learning and information exchange, this platform has already begun to create a global community of pediatric critical care practitioners.

OPENPediatrics also hosts a publicly accessible website, through which anyone can access a collection of openly licensed medical animations and illustrations created for our educational videos. The resources can be downloaded and reused for various educational purposes. The program is also working to develop a patient and parent portal, which will provide educational material designed specifically for patients and families around home care for pediatric patients.

OPENPediatrics is leading the way in promoting the open sharing of knowledge in the medical field, a step that can lead to the improvement of care worldwide.

Presenters
avatar for Stephen Carson

Stephen Carson

Director of Operations, OPENPediatrics
Stephen Carson is Director of Operations for OPENPediatrics (http://openpediatrics.org) where he oversees the activities of the OPENPediatrics staff, provides leadership for OP’s content production strategy, and collaborates with BCH leadership and internal and external stakeholders to grow the OP global community and develop supporting revenue for the program. | | Prior to joining the OPENPediatrics team, he was Director of Communications... Read More →


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Waddington Room

2:15pm

Creative Commons Open Business Models Case Studies & Findings
In March of 2015, with support from the Hewlett Foundation, Creative Commons launched an open business model initiative aimed squarely at showing how Creative Commons licenses can, and are, used by business, nonprofits and governments. This initiative emerged out of a need to show how organizations and creators can produce OER and other Creative Commons licensed works in a way that generates social good in sustainable and financially sound ways.

Creative Commons open business model initiative is being done in an interactive community-based way using an open business model canvas and an online community for sharing and discussion. Creative Commons directly collaborates with organizations using a process that supports both autonomous and collaborative design, development of open business model designs, and ensuing analysis of the results.

In this panel presentation, organizations who worked with Creative Commons to generate an open business model will share their experience. They will describe their motivations, explain how they engaged in the Creative Commons open business model process, outline what they learned, and reveal new opportunities and directions they took as a result.

Creative Commons will describe the tools and processes it used and how those tools and processes evolved and changed through community interaction. Latest versions of tools and process will be compared to starting ones and made available to all participants. Analysis insights from both panel organizations and Creative Commons will be shared.

Creative Commons will outline open business models lessons learned, the types and categories of open business models that emerged, and summarize key findings. Next steps, opportunities for participation and future plans will be described.

Attendees of this session will gain:

- an understanding of the open business model initiative and process

- hands on access to the open business model canvas and other tools they can use to develop their own open business model

- knowledge and insights into how open business models work

- strategies and tactics they can incorporate into their own open business model initiative

- the opportunity to get involved in the initiative in an open and collaborative way

Presenters
avatar for Kate Conners

Kate Conners

Director of Technology Enhanced Learning, University of Minnesota
Kate Conners has nearly three decades of experience in video, digital media, and academic technology production. After serving 11 years as a news director at NBC, Kate began working in the field of education. Her experience as a documentary filmmaker provided her the foundation of investigation and concept visualization. Serving both in public education and higher education for the last 20 years developing and creating educational materials... Read More →
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Boardroom

2:45pm

Collateral Learning: Breaking Predictive Online Learning
A Multimedia Online Learning Immersive Environment (M.O.L.I.E.) course can scaffold and support the seamless integration of content (goals, aims, objectives, digital literacies) within a compelling narrative built on an open infrastructure. This innovative open online learning model showcases efforts at University of Mary Washington and Michigan State University, to support the development and use of a dynamic learning alternative; APIs to bridge Canvas and open source Wordpress, inclusion of open learning resources, embedded librarian, and integration of multimedia resources. These elements are not new and have often been used in isolation crafting a passive learning experience. What M.O.L.I.E. brings is an open and immersive learning experience designed to create convergence among these elements for a dynamic and responsive learning experience - placing learners as active constructors of knowledge.

M.O.L.I.E. sits at the crossroads of collateral learning, creating course synergy around gameplay (choice, quests, role-playing, collaboration), opportunities for reflection, and tapping into the power of storytelling while drawing upon open source tools and materials forging new pathways to energize learners and breakthrough predictive online learning pedagogy.

M.O.L.I.E.'s design draws heavily on a collaborative team approach. Learning Design teams draw upon their individual and collective imaginations, disciplinary expertise, and explore the role of transmedia to foster and challenge us to create compelling and open immersive learning experiences. The existence of M.O.L.I.E. on the open web points the way to 'what is possible' and inspire others to use, remix, and integrate open course resources as we collectively build a new legacy of what is possible on the Open Web.

Our Panel Session shares three projects (Canvas Meets M.O.L.I.E. and the Open Web, In the Beginning: The M.O.L.I.E. Team, and M.O.L.I.E. Matters - Faculty Development Through Immersion) and highlights core features and learning/development processes and integration of open resources and tools. It is time to create EPIC learning experiences that tap into our collective curiosity, promote active engagement and create a 'sense of wonder' around learning!

Presenters
avatar for Mary Kayler

Mary Kayler

Director, CTE&I, University of Mary Washington


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
BC Ballroom

2:45pm

Blended Learning With Open Education Resources to Support Rural Idaho Schools
Rural Idaho Schools often lack the support to offer a mentorship program to new teachers. This professional development opportunity targeted teachers with three or fewer year of experience. The goal was to immerse teachers in a blended learning environment that modeled best practices and introduced the benefits of utilizing open education resources. The community of learners created during this institute would provide a support structure for new teachers in rural schools. During the five day institute, teachers began developing the qualities and skills of a blended teacher, evaluated an LMS, built a library of open education resources in an LMS to support their content areas, and created digital assessments to provide timely data and feedback to guide instruction. The institute also continued for 5 follow-up days throughout the school year which included two group meetings, two video conferences, and one visit from facilitators to each teachers' classroom.

This free summer institute was a collaborative effort between the University of Idaho's Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning and the Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA) to introduce new teachers to the tools and pedagogy of blended learning with open education resources. Blended learning gives Idaho's rural school students the opportunity to experience courses beyond what is possible on site within the district. Use of open education resources allow schools to reconfigure budgets to support the purchase of more technology in place of texts to enable more opportunities for access to both blended learning and open education resources.

This presentation will share feedback and lessons learned from the Blended Learning With Open Education Summer Institute. Feedback will include that from participating teachers, building administrators from each teacher's school, and institute facilitators.

Presenters
avatar for Cassidy Hall

Cassidy Hall

Director and Assistant Professor, University of Idaho Doceo Center for Innovation + Learning
I assist university faculty, pre-service teachers at the university, and k12 teachers around the state with integrating technologies in their classrooms. For k12 teachers, this support is in the form of professional development and often pd credit. I also experiment with many technologies to test out educational applications. | You can access my presentation at: | bit.ly/BuildingBridges16


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Vancouver Island

2:45pm

Using Open Licenses to Enhance Collaboration and Reduce Costs in MOOC Development
The Open Education Consortium (OEC) launched a pilot in 2014 to demonstrate the power of using openly licensed content in Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) development to enable more and better collaboration while significantly reducing costs. Partnering with edX, OEC member institutions were given the opportunity to develop MOOCs on a leading technology platform that offers multiple options for learners. Using existing open courseware and other open educational resources (OER), members have launched MOOCs that offer learners high-quality learning experiences for free but with the option to earn a completion certificate for a modest fee.

Member institutions participating in the pilot include the National Chiao Tung University, Tufts University, University Polytechnic of Madrid, Open University's TESS India project, Anne Arundel Community College, and the University of Hokkaido. They are offering a wide variety of courses that range from the technology of energy, introduction to helicopters, corporate social responsibility, teacher education, introduction to business, and the effects of radiation.

Panelists from the MOOC development team at Tufts University, Anne Arundel Community College, and the University of Hokkaido will share best practices for developing and running openly licensed MOOCs. Lesson learned about developing MOOCs with OER and strategies for enhancing student engagement will be shared.

The Open Education Consortium is a worldwide community of hundreds of higher education institutions and associated organizations committed to advancing open education and its impact on global education. We seek to instill openness as a feature of education around the world, allowing greatly expanded access to education while providing a shared body of knowledge upon which innovative and effective approaches to today's social problems can be built.

EdX, a not-for-profit enterprise founded by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012, was created for students and institutions that seek to transform themselves through cutting-edge technologies, innovative pedagogy, and rigorous courses. Through our institutional partners, the xConsortium, along with other leading global members, we present the best of higher education online, offering opportunity to anyone who wants to achieve, thrive, and grow.

Presenters
avatar for Una Daly

Una Daly

Director, Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources
avatar for Tomo Nagashima

Tomo Nagashima

Instructional Designer, Hokkaido University / Creative Commons Japan


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Waddington Room

2:45pm

Creative Commons Open Business Models Case Studies & Findings
In March of 2015, with support from the Hewlett Foundation, Creative Commons launched an open business model initiative aimed squarely at showing how Creative Commons licenses can, and are, used by business, nonprofits and governments. This initiative emerged out of a need to show how organizations and creators can produce OER and other Creative Commons licensed works in a way that generates social good in sustainable and financially sound ways.

Creative Commons open business model initiative is being done in an interactive community-based way using an open business model canvas and an online community for sharing and discussion. Creative Commons directly collaborates with organizations using a process that supports both autonomous and collaborative design, development of open business model designs, and ensuing analysis of the results.

In this panel presentation, organizations who worked with Creative Commons to generate an open business model will share their experience. They will describe their motivations, explain how they engaged in the Creative Commons open business model process, outline what they learned, and reveal new opportunities and directions they took as a result.

Creative Commons will describe the tools and processes it used and how those tools and processes evolved and changed through community interaction. Latest versions of tools and process will be compared to starting ones and made available to all participants. Analysis insights from both panel organizations and Creative Commons will be shared.

Creative Commons will outline open business models lessons learned, the types and categories of open business models that emerged, and summarize key findings. Next steps, opportunities for participation and future plans will be described.

Attendees of this session will gain:

- an understanding of the open business model initiative and process

- hands on access to the open business model canvas and other tools they can use to develop their own open business model

- knowledge and insights into how open business models work

- strategies and tactics they can incorporate into their own open business model initiative

- the opportunity to get involved in the initiative in an open and collaborative way

Presenters
avatar for Kate Conners

Kate Conners

Director of Technology Enhanced Learning, University of Minnesota
Kate Conners has nearly three decades of experience in video, digital media, and academic technology production. After serving 11 years as a news director at NBC, Kate began working in the field of education. Her experience as a documentary filmmaker provided her the foundation of investigation and concept visualization. Serving both in public education and higher education for the last 20 years developing and creating educational materials... Read More →
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.


Thursday November 19, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Boardroom
 
Friday, November 20
 

7:30am

Breakfast
Friday November 20, 2015 7:30am - 8:30am
BC Ballroom

8:30am

9:30am

Room Transfer
Friday November 20, 2015 9:30am - 9:45am
On Your Own

9:45am

Next Generation Open Courseware
The Gates Foundation's Next Generation Courseware Challenge is funding the creation of learning materials that set in new bar for quality of courseware. The must support personalized learning experiences, provide an engaging and interactive learning experience, demonstrate excellence in inclusive design and user experience, and incorporate learning science to support effective pedagogy. Lumen Learning has partnered with experts from across the community to imagine and create what this next generation of courseware might provide if it is also incorporates the unique permissions and capabilities of open educational resources.

This panel session will explore the topics of inclusive design, user-centered design, learning data and analytics, simulation, and mastery learning using Lumen's next generation courseware design project as a case study.

Presenters
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Jutta Treviranus

Jutta Treviranus

Director, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC), professor and director of an innovative graduate program in inclusive design at OCAD University Toronto.(http://idrc.ocadu.ca, http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/inclusive_design.htm). The IDRC is an international center of expertise in digital inclusion. Jutta also heads the Inclusive Design Institute a multi-university regional research centre on... Read More →


Friday November 20, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
BC Ballroom

9:45am

Cultivating an OER Pathway: A College-Wide Collaborative Approach
Santa Ana College (SAC), a large community college in Southern California, has employed OER in a variety of courses for the past three years, beginning with a pilot initiative secured as a participant in a Next Generation Learning Challenges grant-funded Kaleidoscope Open Course Initiative. After a few years, it was discovered that we had begun pockets of OER, but did not have a sustainable approach for OER growth and adoption. We now have in place a collaborative approach that is fostering OER interest and growth.

Our collaborative endeavor involves the Distance Education department, a task force of faculty from various disciplines, an OER librarian, campus and district administrators, support staff, and an outside OER facilitating organization.

SAC's Distance Education Coordinator and OER librarian will present on the following collaborative initiatives that have forged and strengthened SAC's OER adoption pathway:

* Distance Education department's initiation of OER with select faculty

* OER Task Force comprised of faculty across the disciplines to address curricular and professional development issues

* OER librarian's support of SAC faculty with locating OER connected to course learning outcomes

* Lumen Learning support and partnership toward efficient OER usage

* Campus administrator advocacy of OER programming

* Student Equity funding of OER professional development opportunities

* LMS and media support provided by college support staff

This presentation appeals to faculty, librarians, and administrators pursuing OER on their respective campuses, at any stage of the process. Time will be reserved near the end for audience questions and anecdotal sharing.

Presenters
avatar for Annie Knight

Annie Knight

Librarian, Santa Ana College


Friday November 20, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Vancouver Island

9:45am

Special Briefing: U.S. OER Policy
Public policy is an important component of the environment around OER. Policy can be leveraged to help advance the use and creation of OER by providing resources, creating programs, or giving direction to institutions and schools. It can also be used to remove barriers, such as older systems or practices that favor traditional publishing models. Policymakers themselves can also play a role as effective advocates and validators.

This session will provide a up-to-the minute briefing on the current U.S. policy environment around OER: what is happening in Congress, which states are most active, how this affects the 2016 Presidential election, and where the OER policy space connects with other open movements, such as open data, open government and open access to research. It will also include behind-the-scenes analysis of policy opportunities coming up in the next year, and how members of the audience can become involved.

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e


Friday November 20, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Boardroom

9:45am

A Tale of Two Globes: Exploring the North/South Divide in Use of OER
Mainly considered a socio-economic, political and cultural divide, the disparity between the Global North and Global South is also evident in open education: established trends in OER research originate largely in the US and Europe (Trotter, 2015), while the provision of open content and pedagogy tend to be dominated by Western thinking (Albright, 2005).

Since 2013, the Hewlett-funded OER Research Hub Project (http://oerresearchhub.org) has collected approximately 7,500 valid responses from 180 countries in a world-wide survey designed to enhance our understanding of the use and impact of OER in teaching and learning (de los Arcos et al., 2014). In this presentation we will examine this survey data to explore the existence of a North/South divide in terms of the challenges and opportunities that open education affords educators, formal and informal learners, and put forward recommendations to reach across both worlds.

Presenters
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Friday November 20, 2015 9:45am - 10:15am
Waddington Room

10:15am

Next Generation Open Courseware
The Gates Foundation's Next Generation Courseware Challenge is funding the creation of learning materials that set in new bar for quality of courseware. The must support personalized learning experiences, provide an engaging and interactive learning experience, demonstrate excellence in inclusive design and user experience, and incorporate learning science to support effective pedagogy. Lumen Learning has partnered with experts from across the community to imagine and create what this next generation of courseware might provide if it is also incorporates the unique permissions and capabilities of open educational resources.

This panel session will explore the topics of inclusive design, user-centered design, learning data and analytics, simulation, and mastery learning using Lumen's next generation courseware design project as a case study.

Presenters
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
avatar for Jutta Treviranus

Jutta Treviranus

Director, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jutta Treviranus is the Director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC), professor and director of an innovative graduate program in inclusive design at OCAD University Toronto.(http://idrc.ocadu.ca, http://www.ocadu.ca/programs/graduate_studies/inclusive_design.htm). The IDRC is an international center of expertise in digital inclusion. Jutta also heads the Inclusive Design Institute a multi-university regional research centre on... Read More →


Friday November 20, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
BC Ballroom

10:15am

An Implementation Model for Open Licensing Policy: A Case of Washington Community and Technical Colleges System
In 2010, Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges (SBCTC) instituted the nation's first statewide Open Licensing Policy as an explicit measure to support that planning principle and to begin to use SBCTC-sponsored or managed initiatives to create momentum and competency around OER throughout the system. This policy is focused strongly on educational access, specifying that "All digital software, educational resources and knowledge produced through competitive grants, offered through or managed by SBCTC, will carry a Creative Commons Attributions license."

SBCTC has recently revised the Open Policy implementation model to provide the greater support and education needed in order to ensure this model could be applied agency wide without too much disruption of the workflow. In 2014-15, SBCTC gave out over 120 competitive awards totaling more than $17,500,000 and this model has been applied to each of them. This new model requires that each unit in the Education division is responsible for releasing the grant works that flow through the division under a CC BY license. While the SBCTC eLearning & Open Education department provides support (training, consultation, and troubleshooting) throughout the entire process, each divisional unit makes the customized decision about resources' terms of use based on individual unit's own context and needs. Specifically, this model recommends that all divisional units designate staff responsible for the open licensing of grant-funded work.
This model has been successfully applied to several grant projects, such as Project I-DEA (a curriculum design project that develops 34 flipped and blended instructional modules to increase digital, career, and college-readiness skills of adult English learners), the Competency-Based Learning Project(a project that develops a completely online, openly licensed, competency-based business transfer degree), and Faculty Learning Community (a professional learning project that funds faculty learning communities). The project managers reported that this implementation model helped the participants properly mark their works under a CC BY License, thus significantly increasing the awareness of open licensing and OER in general.

However, this policy continues to undergo modification. SBCTC considers this policy as a beginning point of more extended Open Policy that will eventually support not only the SBCTC managed grant works, but also all resources produced by the SBCTC and fellow state government agencies in the field of Education. This session will discuss the process involved in the development and application of the Open Policy Implementation Model, and the vision for the future application of the policy.

Presenters
avatar for Boyoung Chae

Boyoung Chae

Policy Associate, eLearning & Open Education, Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
avatar for Mark Jenkins

Mark Jenkins

Director, eLearning & Open Education, SBCTC


Friday November 20, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Boardroom

10:15am

Who are the open learners? Profiling informal users of OER repositories
Law, Perryman & Law (2013) have analysed the provision of open resources by The Open University through its OpenLearn platform and through iTunesU, asking how content can be delivered in ways which meet both learner and institutional needs. This study builds on this work by including supplemental data collected by the OER Research Hub (OERRH, 2014). OERRH provides a focus for research on OER, and the impact is having on learning and teaching. In order to ensure that the areas of focus remained consistent throughout the project the research was guided by eleven key hypotheses about open education (de los Arcos et al., 2014). The central hypotheses investigated across the project focus on the impact of OER on learners and the ways in which open licensing affects sharing and use of resources. Several hypotheses pertained directly to informal learning, such as how informal learners choose OER, the techniques they use to study, and whether use of OER relates to a desire for formal study.

In collaboration with OER repositories - primarily iTunesU, OpenLearn, and Saylor Academy - an invitation to complete a survey was circulated to informal learners who used these sites between 2013 and 2014. Several thousand valid responses were received. Most countries were represented and people from every continent contributed information. The presentation will focus on the identifiable differences between repository user profiles and the analysis will enrich the statistics with provided by learners around the world.

- Data suggests that patterns in age, gender, employment and study habits can be discerned between OER repositories

- A high proportion of OER users are educated to bachelor degree level

- Perceived relevance seems to be the most important factor for selecting OER; relation to clear learning outcomes is also important

- Attractive presentation is the least important factor for OER choice

- Across the repositories there was a similar pattern of generally high satisfaction with the resources provided

- Use of OER makes some learners to believe themselves more likely to enter formal study, though others believe it makes this less likely (perhaps because learning needs are being met)

- High proportions across all samples indicated that they would download further materials from the repository and feel empowered to undertake further study in a related area

- One unexpected finding is that high proportions of informal OER users report that they adapt OER to their needs.

- Further work is needed to explore learner understandings of this term, especially in relation to open licensing and how it is perceived

Presenters
avatar for Bea de los Arcos

Bea de los Arcos

Research Associate, The Open University
Dr. Beatriz de los Arcos Researcher, Institute of Educational Technology, The Open University, United Kingdom | Researching the impact of OER on teaching and learning practices with colleagues at the OER Research Hub Project; leading the project's collaboration with educational programs in the K12 sector. |  
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
avatar for Beck Pitt

Beck Pitt

Research Assistant, The Open University
Hi there! I'm a researcher on the Open Education Research Hub and Opening Educational Practices in Scotland (OEPS) project at the Open University (UK). Find out more: http://oerresearchhub.org | | Come and talk to me about all things open and how we (the Hub) could help you!


Friday November 20, 2015 10:15am - 10:45am
Waddington Room

10:45am

Break
Coffee & tea provided

Friday November 20, 2015 10:45am - 11:00am
On Your Own

11:00am

Small Pieces, Loosely Joined: How Making Open Textbooks (Could Be) Like Making Public Domain Audiobooks
LibriVox, started in 2005, asked volunteers to collaborate together to create free public domain audiobooks, and give them away on the Internet. Ten years later, the collection is 8,000 books strong, ranging from Austen to Zarathustra, with the "Romance of Rubber" in between. In this talk LibriVox (and Pressbooks) founder Hugh McGuire will talk about the complex job of creating and publishing an audio book, a process that often takes a year or more, with collaboration among dozens of people: narrators, prooflisteners, Book Coordinators, Meta Coordinators, and a host of custom hacked software. He'll look at how and why LibriVox has been successful, and how lessons from LibriVox might be applied to creating a global network of creators of OER.

Presenters
HM

Hugh McGuire

Founder, Pressbooks / LibriVox
technology guy


Friday November 20, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
BC Ballroom

11:00am

The Perils of Policy: Potential OER Pitfalls of Copyright Policies and OA Legislation
In research universities, course materials encompass an enormous variety of types and formats, ranging from traditional textbooks to digitized versions of rare or unique primary sources in special collections to born-digital content. One-size-fits-all open access legislation and institutional policies created to cover conventional journal articles, monographs, or textbooks don't begin to cover all the rights issues that can arise in connection with these materials. UCLA's senior campus counsel, associate university librarian for collection management and scholarly communication, and executive director of federal relations suggest ways to adapt policies and steer legislation to make them more broadly OER-friendly.

Presenters
AB

Amy Blum

Interim Vice Chancellor, UCLA
avatar for Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

AUL, UCLA Library
KK

Kim Kovacs

Executive Director, Federal Relations, UCLA


Friday November 20, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Boardroom

11:00am

For whom, for what? Not-yetness and challenging the 'stuff' of open education
David Wiley's calls to "stop saying high quality" at the expense of talking about learning shed light on core issues facing OERs and open education. Focusing on the "stuff" of open education can obscure crucial questions: for whom, and for what, is the stuff supposed to be? What values and politics inform its creation and content, and what are the gains and losses involved in "black-boxing" these? Biesta (2007) argues that "education is a moral practice, rather than a technical or technological one" (p.10), and it is not immune to "the influences of digitisation, interpretation or cultural understanding" (Knox 2013, p.25). Digital education practitioners and researchers need to take account of how we privilege stuff, and what work that stuff does for and to other understandings of openness.

Futures for open education might fruitfully grapple with other modes of openness which engage students more fully in the process of knowledge creation, rather than the consumption of resources, however openly shared. Can and should we strive to encourage our students to be who MacNeill called "open practitioners," learning how to appropriately participate in an educational ecosystem that may not yet value those practices? These modes of openness are risky, and their outcomes can be uncertain, so we also need a way of approaching them that can take account of this risk: one such approach is what we call not-yetness (Collier and Ross 2015, in press). In this session, we will share examples of alternative modes of openness, and argue that not-yetness provides a critical and inclusive space for broadening views of open education. Rather than focus on "what works" or "what it looks like," not-yetness provides space for "what's possible" and invites educators to embrace the process and provocation of learning.

Presenters
avatar for Amy Collier

Amy Collier

Associate Provost for Digital Learning, Middlebury College
avatar for Jen Ross

Jen Ross

University of Edinburgh
I'm part of the Centre for Research in Digital Education at the University of Edinburgh, co-creator of the E-learning and Digital Cultures MOOC (EDCMOOC) and the Manifesto for Teaching Online (https://onlineteachingmanifesto.wordpress.com), and former director of the MSc in Digital Education programme (http://digital.education.ed.ac.uk).


Friday November 20, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Waddington Room

11:30am

Making the Open Infrastructure Practical
OER, open content, open textbooks - whatever you call them, there are approximately one billion pieces of content in the world published under open licenses that allow you to engage in the 5R activities (retain, reuse, revise, remix, redistribute) in the service of learning. However, because open educational resources are born digital, their uses by both learners and teachers must be mediated by technology.

Several technical challenges present themselves as Lumen Learning works to make OER as easy to adopt as possible, such as:

- How do we create, store, manage, and display the attributions that are required by open licenses?
- How do make OER easy for faculty use in their LMSs - and in such a way that students' access to material doesn't end when the semester does?
- How do we make the 5Rs easy for faculty with limited technical expertise?
- How do provide easy offline access to OER?
- How do we better empower faculty to support student learning through assessment? - How do we align OER and open assessments with learning outcomes in ways that support rigorous research and enable continuous improvement?

In this presentation we will demo Lumen's open source platform for solving these problems (and many others) and describe our solutions, with particular attention to the role played by open standards like LTI, QTI, and Common Cartridge.

Lumen's open source platform combines and integrates many existing pieces of open source software - to which Lumen actively contributes - together with many newly developed pieces of open source software. Major pieces of the open source platform include Wordpress, Pressbooks, Candela Citations, Candela Outcomes, Candela LTI, Thin CC Export, Snapshot, and Open Embedded Assessments.

Presenters
avatar for Bracken Mosbacker

Bracken Mosbacker

Director of Development, Lumen Learning
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Friday November 20, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
BC Ballroom

11:30am

Collaboration, Input, Revision, Repeat: The ongoing creation of an open source Biology text
From Concept to First edition Jane Gair and Charles Molnar took 4 months to produce a suitable non-majors text edition with ancillary resources based on the OpenStax Concepts of Biology textbook.

This presentation will provide the details and lessons learned on how to adapt, remix, and create the Concepts of Biology-1st Canadian Edition Open Textbook. The presentation will describe the process of adaptation from a faculty perspective, as well as the process involved in receiving student feedback on the Open Textbook and how that feedback then resulted in a further adaptation and iteration of the textbook.

Presenters
CM

charles molnar

Instructor, Camosun College


Friday November 20, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Vancouver Island

11:30am

The Perils of Policy: Potential OER Pitfalls of Copyright Policies and OA Legislation
In research universities, course materials encompass an enormous variety of types and formats, ranging from traditional textbooks to digitized versions of rare or unique primary sources in special collections to born-digital content. One-size-fits-all open access legislation and institutional policies created to cover conventional journal articles, monographs, or textbooks don't begin to cover all the rights issues that can arise in connection with these materials. UCLA's senior campus counsel, associate university librarian for collection management and scholarly communication, and executive director of federal relations suggest ways to adapt policies and steer legislation to make them more broadly OER-friendly.

Presenters
AB

Amy Blum

Interim Vice Chancellor, UCLA
avatar for Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

Sharon Farb, PhD, JD

AUL, UCLA Library
KK

Kim Kovacs

Executive Director, Federal Relations, UCLA


Friday November 20, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Boardroom

11:30am

Using Open to Create a Culture of Innovation
Large scale open education projects touch all areas of the organization, creating changes to the culture that can better prepare the organization for future innovations. The investments in open also create infrastructure and capability that can be used to experiment with new pedagogies, delivery methods, and student success approaches. The session will explore the organizational factors that support a culture of innovation and review project approaches that have created new models that are successful, and new models that are problematic.

Presenters
avatar for Mark Jenkins

Mark Jenkins

Director, eLearning & Open Education, SBCTC
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning


Friday November 20, 2015 11:30am - 12:00pm
Waddington Room

12:00pm

Lunch (On Your Own)
Thursday and Friday, we have left lunch open for you to explore the food trucks and restaurants of downtown Vancouver. Street Food Vancouver has an excellent website and mobile apps (Apple | Android | Windows) to help make finding lunch easier.

Friday November 20, 2015 12:00pm - 1:00pm
On Your Own

1:00pm

Open by Design: Integrating OER into the Instructional Design and Development Process
Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) has built a leading OER program, including one certificate program and two full Associate Degrees available online, with zero textbook costs for students. This comprehensive program was built by pioneering faculty and staff, with resources and support from a vibrant OER community, and supplemented with free digital library collection materials.

In order to establish a culture of openness to support sustainable growth in utilization of OER and in sharing of resources, it was critical that Open Educational Resources be integrated into the online course design and development process at NOVA. This session will provide an overview of online course design and development at NOVA, and how the review and adoption of OER became a natural part of the process. We will discuss the role of Faculty, Instructional Designers and Librarians in integrating OER into a broad college curriculum, and how organizations like Lumen Learning provide key open content, training, and support for success.

We will highlight our future plans for expanding OER at NOVA and how we are contributing to a system-wide initiative to offer associate degree options with zero textbook costs to students at all community colleges in Virginia. We will share lessons learned and offer suggestions for introducing, implementing, or expanding OER initiatives at virtually any institution.

Presenters
avatar for Preston Davis

Preston Davis

Director, Instructional Service, NOVA
I have worked in higher education for 20 years… as faculty, administrator, and consultant. As Director of Instructional Services at NOVA, I oversee the online learning and educational technology services, manage instructional training and certification, and lead the OER initiative. I also find time to teach a philosophy course on occasion. | I earned BS and MA degrees from Old Dominion University, and a doctorate from The George... Read More →


Friday November 20, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
BC Ballroom

1:00pm

Open Policy Network: Projects Update
Join members of the Open Policy Network (OPN) to learn about this network of open organizations working to ensure publicly funded resources are openly licensed by default. Updates on all current OPN projects will be discussed. Join this important conversation and help us change the default funding on public money from closed to open. http://openpolicynetwork.org

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.


Friday November 20, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Boardroom

1:00pm

The sale of 'Open Content': Recognizing and negotiating philosophical quandaries in the OER definition
Despite clear objectives and model successes for the OER discipline, mainstream discourse continues to equate the concept of Open to elements of economic/monetary cost. By itself this conflation is a frustration for the field, but when considered from a critical theory lens the quandary is symptomatic of philosophical contradictions within OER's marriage of science, technology and education, a confluence that results in Open Education but also puts stressors on said creation.

This presentation is the continuation of work analyzing the historical and philosophical shaping of the OER movement, connecting the discipline beyond pragmatic applications and to its sociocultural residence. As a frame of reference, the presentation will compare the theoretical works of Wiley, most notably the reusability paradox (2002) with the postmodern theories of Lyotard, specifically his concept of immaterials (1985). While Wiley's model for learning objects heavily mirrors Lyotard's model for message interaction, the terms and definitions each use to reference similar concepts create problems; Wiley's use of 'content' evokes information in transfer to an end-user, while Lyotard's use of 'material' is heavily focused on the tangible. Since 'content' as a term has morphed well beyond domain information to now appropriate technologically-saturated elements including field information, data and metadata, its use evokes objective solutionism where problems exist because of a lack of proper tools (Morozov, 2012).

To substitute Lyotard's 'materials' would only swap one set of obstacles for another; 'materials' denotes human touch but fails to appropriate the analytics and metadata at the heart of much of technology's current innovation. This is why practitioners continue to provide ahistorical tool solutions to a spectre problem.

The 'free vs. open' debate truly takes shape when relating the concrete back to the abstract. To open licenses and freely share across all strata limits the opportunities of content providers to track, control and market their brand. This loss of control is some of the reason why Open is antithetical to the governance and operation of many societies and cultures, most notably those of Western origin (Deleuze, 2006). Yet to herald Open as a moral good or value is to engage the subject along the same false dichotomies of progress and emancipation that have led to corporations and organizations holding more power in societies than citizens (Lyotard, 1984).

OER is a postmodern discipline; it understands the importance of information networks connected through telecommunications technology, and it recognizes the localized symbols and structures needed to interpret and use. The end of this presentation will be a call to recognize the messiness of a field where most are welcome, and from that recognition to negotiate through model and criticism the benefits of open rather than free.

Presenters
avatar for Rolin Moe

Rolin Moe

Director of Educational Technology & Media, Seattle Pacific University
truth is not capitalized =)


Friday November 20, 2015 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Waddington Room

1:30pm

Patterns of Participation in a Federated Wiki Class
Federated Wiki is a new open-source technology (invented by the inventor of the original wiki) that provides for fluid reuse and remix of materials. The system allows materials to flow from server to server, accumulating revisions while preserving document history. (More information on the technology and its use in education can be found in the article Federated Education on the Hapgood blog). The technology is particularly well suited to open pedagogies, combining the collaboration and reuse of wiki with the personal ownership of blogs.

This ease of remix and revision creates new patterns of digital participation. To better understand these, we are in the process of building high-level analytics tools that capture such patterns and demonstrate how diverse behaviors contribute to the expansion of knowledge in a federated educational experience. In this session we will present the outcome of that work, as well as show how cooperation analytics can be profitably applied to the management of an open class.

Presenters
MC

Michael Caulfield

Washington State University Vancouver


Friday November 20, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
BC Ballroom

1:30pm

EdReady as a personalized-learning wedge for OER adoption
EdReady is a personalized-learning platform that can be customized to ascertain and improve student readiness in math (English to come in 2016) for any course of study. EdReady is being used to differentiate math instruction in middle and high schools, to improve college math readiness for matriculating students, to support co-requisite and accelerated models of math remediation for college students, and much else besides. We have seen positive and often dramatic results in most use-cases, encouraging continued experimentation even as we refine approaches that we know work well.

The NROC Project is supporting EdReady adoptions nationwide, including deployments to entire states and systems. This uptake means that EdReady is driving OER usage at multiple levels of the formal education system in the United States, including secondary, post-secondary, and adult educational institutions. Educators and administrators using EdReady tell us that the platform is changing their pedagogical practices and their expectations around instructional resources, fostering greater autonomy and personalization. We believe that EdReady is poised to become one of the most important vehicles we have yet seen for getting OER into classrooms, demonstrating the effectiveness of the materials, and thus supporting their continued use and improvement over the long term.

In this session, we will review EdReady's basic design, adoption metrics, and learner outcomes for a variety of use-cases. We will also discuss some of the future plans for EdReady, especially as they relate to OER and the open education community.

Presenters
avatar for Ahrash Bissell

Ahrash Bissell

Manager - EdReady, The NROC Project
Ahrash Bissell manages the development of EdReady, a personalized learning platform with an initial focus on math. The NROC Project (also known as the Monterey Institute for Technology and Education) is a community-guided, non-profit effort focused on new models for OER development, distribution, and use. EdReady provides a turnkey pathway for institutions to resolve long-standing and significant readiness challenges by leveraging OER... Read More →


Friday November 20, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Vancouver Island

1:30pm

Open Policy Network: Projects Update
Join members of the Open Policy Network (OPN) to learn about this network of open organizations working to ensure publicly funded resources are openly licensed by default. Updates on all current OPN projects will be discussed. Join this important conversation and help us change the default funding on public money from closed to open. http://openpolicynetwork.org

Presenters
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.


Friday November 20, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Boardroom

1:30pm

OER Champions
At OpenEd14, Sara Frank Bristow's research made a lot of waves in the OER family pool: OER powerhouse states have each had an OER champion to light the torches and ignite the OER vision for others. As a result, OER policies, movements, and evangelists have flourished (Bristow, 2014).

Bristow's work shed light on an opportunity gap. There seemed to be a need for K-12 OER champion identification and training in order to promote and spread the OER vision faster and farther. So, several attendees decided to put Bristow's OER Champion theory to the test this year and proposed a one day OER Champions Academy - Institute for Open Leadership.

We identified ten K-12 OER champions, named them as fellows and invited them to attend the Champions Academy. We identified three strands and designed workshops for each one:

- OER Bootcamp (preach)

- OER Building (teach)

- OER Policy (reach)

Next, we created advocacy torches/toolkits so the OER Champion Fellows can have an advocacy implementation plan for the 2015-2016 school year and a purpose to connect with fellows monthly. They will report back at Open Ed 2016 so we can track the OER Champion theory in practice.

Come and hear directly from the organizers and some of the Champions themselves.

Presenters
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula.


Friday November 20, 2015 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Waddington Room

2:00pm

Break
Coffee & tea provided

Friday November 20, 2015 2:00pm - 2:15pm
On Your Own

2:15pm

The Great VCU Bike Race Book: Connected Learning meets the UCI Road World Championships
Imagine your university was going to close for a week in the 1st month of the semester because the UCI Road World Championships was overtaking your city. Residential students could stay in their residence halls, but classrooms were to be closed and traveling to campus would be extremely difficult for non-residential students. Next, imagine you are charged with considering how you might turn that situation into one or more learning experience. The open Web to the rescue, #amiright?

The Great VCU Bike Race Book (#vcubrb) was borne of this opportunity. The Great #vcubrb is a unique Connected Learning experience at Virginia Commonwealth University that will take place during the Fall 2015 semester. There are three purposes for the #vcubrb. 1) To provide a purposeful, enjoyable learning experience during the Bike Race week, especially for residential students who would otherwise not have any academic work to occupy them. 2) To give students an opportunity to participate in an innovative online course that aligns with the VCU Quality Enhancement Plan's goals of integrative learning by means of digital fluency. 3) To provide a unique faculty development experience that will advance VCU faculty's involvement in distinctive online learning.

In Spring, 2015, faculty members from across the university proposed "tracks" that focus on areas of inquiry that are organized around disciplinary or cross-disciplinary themes. Ultimately, 25 faculty members proposed tracks involving topics ranging from archaeology to kinesiology. Each track is a 1-credit section of a course that students can register for at a massively reduced rate. Given the nature of the course, each track could accommodate many students, perhaps as many as 100 or more per track depending on the activities and design.

During the week of the race, students will produce various kinds of work related to the bike race, e.g., blogs, tweets, photographs, audio, video (YouTube, Vine, Instagram, etc.). Also during the race, these products, categorized by tracks and identified by tags, will be aggregated in more-or-less real time onto a learning engagement "dashboard" page created and maintained by VCU's ALT Lab. In short, during the race week, VCU students will be creators, researchers, and "citizen journalists," making the academic vitality, creativity, and diversity of our students visible to the world in an exciting, innovative way.

In the weeks following the race, faculty and their student teams will work with ALT Lab to curate the best works into a "Great VCU Bike Race Book" that would live on the open Web. "Book," then, is a metaphor suggesting a collection that is organized and curated. The aggregated materials during the bike race week will be an initial instance of the "book." Materials selected as the "best of the race" will make up the next instance of the "book."

At this session, you'll hear retrospective reflections from the key members of the Great VCU Bike Race Book team. Gear up!

Presenters
avatar for Alan Levine

Alan Levine

Top Dog, CogDog It
Barks about and plays with web tech. Likes photography, guitars, storytelling, blogging, hiking, coding, the Who. Hates egos and spammers. Has shots.
avatar for Tom Woodward

Tom Woodward

Assistant Director of Learning Innovation and Onli, Virginia Commonwealth University


Friday November 20, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
BC Ballroom

2:15pm

Using the CCCOER community of practice to increase adoptions in community colleges
A key component in many community college adoption campaigns has been participating in communities of practice. Leaders of college OER campaigns from across the US will share will share their successful strategies and tactics for creating a community of practice by participating in and leveraging Community College Consortium for OER (CCCOER) activities.

Etienne Wenger defines communities of practice as "groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly." With over 250 member colleges in 21 states and provinces, CCCOER encourages collaboration between members and invites OER project presentations at monthly advisory meetings. Experienced members advise those who are just getting started and best practices are shared. Access to a community of college OER experts through the CCCOER listserv makes it easier for new members to find and adopt the highest quality OER available in their disciplines.

Monthly webinars featuring OER leaders at community colleges, universities, and educational organizations around the world keep the community informed of new research findings, OER projects, and open policies. Meet-ups at regional and national conferences provide an opportunity to share and promote the OER adoption successes of our members with colleagues throughout higher education.

Panelists will describe how these activities have informed and strengthened their local OER projects, as well as how they are serving as guides to newcomers to the OER field.

Presenters
JG

James Glapa-Grossklag

Dean, College of the Canyons


Friday November 20, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Vancouver Island

2:15pm

International Organizations and OER policy instruments
This presentation is part of a PhD research study entitled: Impact of International Organizations on Governmental OER Policies. It is registered at the Open University Netherlands under the Global OER Graduate Network (GO-GN). The primary objective of this research is to explore how International Organizations (IOs) are influencing governments around the world in their OER policy approaches and with what impact.

The following three main research questions are central to the study:
1. What OER policy instruments can be identified as being used by different IOs?
2. What impact do IO OER policy instruments have on provincial, state and national governmental OER policies?
3. What recommendations, if implemented, would lead to IO OER policy instruments more effectively supporting governmental OER policies?

OER policy instruments at the level of International Organizations (IOs) are defined, within the context of this research, as instruments or courses of action by IOs, that can directly or indirectly contribute to the development or support of governmental OER policies.

The research methodology includes, amongst other approaches, interviews with representatives from International Organizations and interviews with governmental representatives in different countries.

International organizations in the study include Intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) such as, EC, COL, UNESCO, OECD, OIF; International nongovernmental organizations (INGOs) such as Creative Commons and OEC, and Foundations such as the Hewlett Foundation and OSF.

The aim of this presentation is to present preliminary results from interviews with International Organizations on how they influence governmental OER policies.

Presenters
avatar for Igor Lesko

Igor Lesko

Operations Manager & Open Education Specialist, Open Education Consortium
Open Education, Open Policy


Friday November 20, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Boardroom

2:15pm

Key Learnings from the Development of Achieve's State OER Policy Recommendations for K-12 in the U.S.
Achieve will present its recently released recommended state policies that can support the use of OER in classrooms as part of college- and career-ready standards implementation in U.S. K-12 education. Additionally, Achieve will share key learnings from the development of these recommendations, though conversations and feedback provided from state leaders and OER experts at partner organizations.

Achieve's OER policy recommendations are centered on two main tenets, which provide a basis and framework for additional recommendations:

- States and districts should use OER as part of their strategies to support the implementation of college- and career-ready standards. Furthermore, when public funds are used, the instructional materials created should be openly licensed.

- States and districts should ensure that all instructional materials being used, including OER, are high quality and aligned to college- and career-ready standards.

The additional recommendations below support the integrity of implementing high-quality OER aligned to college- and career-ready standards:

- States should develop strategies for using OER to support college- and career-ready standards implementation. These strategies should include goals and relevant timelines as well as an individual or team of individuals to lead these efforts.

- States and districts should use specific criteria and review processes to measure alignment to the college- and career-ready standards to ensure that OER being used meet the level of quality needed to support teaching to those standards.

- States and districts should use OER to leverage common standards as an opportunity for collaboration in the development, refinement and continuous improvement of OER instructional materials.

- States and districts should include OER in professional learning activities. This professional learning can increase knowledge and awareness of OER and their benefits and bolster the reputation of OER among educators, administrators and other stakeholders as materials that can be of high quality.

As part of this presentation, Achieve will highlight state and district actions that exemplify these recommendations in action. Additionally, key learnings from the development of these recommendations will be shared, such as:

- Recommendations like these have a broad base of support between states, funders and partner organizations that advocate for the use of OER.

- Each of these recommendations are actionable in some form across states; however local context can and should inform how these recommendations are enacted locally.

- Future efforts and recommendations to support the use of OER at scale should address strategies for states to appropriately promote and advocate for the use of OER in districts, where most adoption decisions occur.

Presenters
avatar for Hans Voss

Hans Voss

Policy Associate, Achieve
Hans Voss is a Policy Associate at Achieve, a bipartisan, nonprofit education reform organization in Washington, DC that helps states raise academic standards and graduation requirements, improve assessments, and strengthen accountability. Much of his work focuses on Achieve's Open Educational Resources (OER) Projects, which include the Achieve OER Rubrics and Evaluation Tool and the Achieve OER Institute.


Friday November 20, 2015 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Waddington Room

2:45pm

The Great VCU Bike Race Book: Connected Learning meets the UCI Road World Championships
Imagine your university was going to close for a week in the 1st month of the semester because the UCI Road World Championships was overtaking your city. Residential students could stay in their residence halls, but classrooms were to be closed and traveling to campus would be extremely difficult for non-residential students. Next, imagine you are charged with considering how you might turn that situation into one or more learning experience. The open Web to the rescue, #amiright?

The Great VCU Bike Race Book (#vcubrb) was borne of this opportunity. The Great #vcubrb is a unique Connected Learning experience at Virginia Commonwealth University that will take place during the Fall 2015 semester. There are three purposes for the #vcubrb. 1) To provide a purposeful, enjoyable learning experience during the Bike Race week, especially for residential students who would otherwise not have any academic work to occupy them. 2) To give students an opportunity to participate in an innovative online course that aligns with the VCU Quality Enhancement Plan's goals of integrative learning by means of digital fluency. 3) To provide a unique faculty development experience that will advance VCU faculty's involvement in distinctive online learning.

In Spring, 2015, faculty members from across the university proposed "tracks" that focus on areas of inquiry that are organized around disciplinary or cross-disciplinary themes. Ultimately, 25 faculty members proposed tracks involving topics ranging from archaeology to kinesiology. Each track is a 1-credit section of a course that students can register for at a massively reduced rate. Given the nature of the course, each track could accommodate many students, perhaps as many as 100 or more per track depending on the activities and design.

During the week of the race, students will produce various kinds of work related to the bike race, e.g., blogs, tweets, photographs, audio, video (YouTube, Vine, Instagram, etc.). Also during the race, these products, categorized by tracks and identified by tags, will be aggregated in more-or-less real time onto a learning engagement "dashboard" page created and maintained by VCU's ALT Lab. In short, during the race week, VCU students will be creators, researchers, and "citizen journalists," making the academic vitality, creativity, and diversity of our students visible to the world in an exciting, innovative way.

In the weeks following the race, faculty and their student teams will work with ALT Lab to curate the best works into a "Great VCU Bike Race Book" that would live on the open Web. "Book," then, is a metaphor suggesting a collection that is organized and curated. The aggregated materials during the bike race week will be an initial instance of the "book." Materials selected as the "best of the race" will make up the next instance of the "book."

At this session, you'll hear retrospective reflections from the key members of the Great VCU Bike Race Book team. Gear up!

Presenters
avatar for Alan Levine

Alan Levine

Top Dog, CogDog It
Barks about and plays with web tech. Likes photography, guitars, storytelling, blogging, hiking, coding, the Who. Hates egos and spammers. Has shots.
avatar for Tom Woodward

Tom Woodward

Assistant Director of Learning Innovation and Onli, Virginia Commonwealth University


Friday November 20, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
BC Ballroom

2:45pm

Using the CCCOER community of practice to increase adoptions in community colleges
A key component in many community college adoption campaigns has been participating in communities of practice. Leaders of college OER campaigns from across the US will share will share their successful strategies and tactics for creating a community of practice by participating in and leveraging Community College Consortium for OER (CCCOER) activities.

Etienne Wenger defines communities of practice as "groups of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly." With over 250 member colleges in 21 states and provinces, CCCOER encourages collaboration between members and invites OER project presentations at monthly advisory meetings. Experienced members advise those who are just getting started and best practices are shared. Access to a community of college OER experts through the CCCOER listserv makes it easier for new members to find and adopt the highest quality OER available in their disciplines.

Monthly webinars featuring OER leaders at community colleges, universities, and educational organizations around the world keep the community informed of new research findings, OER projects, and open policies. Meet-ups at regional and national conferences provide an opportunity to share and promote the OER adoption successes of our members with colleagues throughout higher education.

Panelists will describe how these activities have informed and strengthened their local OER projects, as well as how they are serving as guides to newcomers to the OER field.

Presenters
JG

James Glapa-Grossklag

Dean, College of the Canyons


Friday November 20, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Vancouver Island

2:45pm

Thinking Outside the Textbook: Using OER grants to fund faculty innovation in teaching and learning
Open education breaks down barriers to access for students, but it can also be a powerful tool for improving faculty instruction. The North Carolina State University Libraries' Alt-Textbook project charges instructors to ""do something a traditional textbook can't"" and NCSU faculty have responded with amazing projects that use video, crowdsourcing, and student-centered practice for powerful, tailored, and innovative instruction.

Will Cross, Director of Copyright & Digital Scholarship, will introduce the program and the Libraries' support for open education as a tool not just for cost-saving, but for shaping the future of education. As examples of the transformative power of OER, NCSU faculty members Dr. Maria Gallardo-Williams (chemistry) and Dr. Michael Evans (education) will discuss their innovative projects that span disciplines and leverage digital technologies to connect faculty teaching with student needs in exciting new ways.

Gallardo-Williams will introduce her SMART Organic Chemistry Lab Video Books: a project that partners with students to develop lab training materials in response to student needs for better instructional resources, and delivers them in a free, easy-to-access format. In SMART (Student-Made Assistance Ready Technology) labs, information is everywhere and can be accessed in many different ways and formats.

Evans will describe his graduate course in Online Collaborations in Education that engages graduate students in the collaborative creation of an academic resource that serves the pedagogy of connected, participatory learning. Evans' work combines research, pedagogy, and student-centered outcomes to chart a course into new forms of teaching, assessment, and dissemination.

Join us for a discussion of open education as a tool that has empowered instructors to explore and develop new models for teaching and learning and to explore sterling examples of faculty projects that wouldn't be possible with closed, print, commercial materials. The future of education is in development, and it's open.

Presenters
avatar for William Cross

William Cross

Director, Copyright & Digital Scholarship, North Carolina State University
William M. Cross is the Director of the Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center at North Carolina State University where he provides advice and instruction to campus stakeholders on copyright, licensing, and scholarly communication issues. As a student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Will earned an M.A. in Technology & Communication, a J.D. in Law, and an M.S.L.S. in Library Science. Before joining the Copyright and Digital... Read More →
avatar for Maria Gallardo-Williams

Maria Gallardo-Williams

Teaching Associate Professor/ Lab Director, North Carolina State University
Maria Gallardo-Williams spends most of her time learning and teaching organic chemistry and other assorted things. She is the Director of the undergraduate Organic Chemistry Teaching Labs at North Carolina State University, where she gets to share her interest in playing with chemicals with her students on a daily basis.


Friday November 20, 2015 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Waddington Room

3:15pm

Room Transfer
Friday November 20, 2015 3:15pm - 3:30pm
On Your Own

3:30pm

Open Education: Sustainability versus Vulnerability
The idea of innovation in education (or anywhere) is dependent on the ability of people to embrace a shared problem (Nisbet & Collins 1978). In doing so, the seeking of solutions often gives rise to tensions; these develop from dichotomies of ideas and practices that can emerge (Kuhn 1959). In the context of open education for example, the idea of 'open' versus 'closed' provides a helpful simplification on the one hand, but tension can arise from the exaggeration of contributions to the open community, as observed in 'openwashing' (Villem 2014).

In open education, many innovative initiatives rely on the presence of a 'champion'. These people share the characteristics of being able to lead in different directions and reject old solutions (Kuhn 1959). Von Hippel (2005) suggests that in the present day, these people share the ability to navigate around organisational structures and also work openly with others.

This paper examines the sustainability of open educational practice in a UK university. It is a longitudinal study employing mixed methods to track progress. In part one of the analysis, the 'reach and impact' of the open educational resources (OERs) was examined some three years post-funding (Rolfe 2015). This paper will present part two of the analysis and explore open practice through the lens of innovation.

These government-funded projects typically gave rise to great lurches forward in OER release and open practice. The data shows that beyond the initial funding, open educational practices are sustained by individuals and teams:

"It has changed my practice in terms of whenever I'm doing anything I think how could this be an OER or how could it supplement what I'm doing?" (Interviewee).

At institutional-level the evidence of impact is patchy with the initiatives causing little more than a 'shuffling of feet' (Trump & Georgiades 1972). Areas of vulnerability have been identified including the reliance on champions, and the inability to take action despite embedding 'open' at strategic level.

The paper will provide a series of recommendations for the community on how to maximise the sustained impact of open education projects based on these experiences.

Presenters
avatar for Vivien Rolfe

Vivien Rolfe

Lecturer, University of the West of England
Sharing open educational resources to support life sciences education. Like to animate physiological processes. Saxophoning. Dog walking. Jellied Eels.


Friday November 20, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
BC Ballroom

3:30pm

Initiation into the Mysteries of OER: Using a MOOC to Facilitate Faculty Transition to the 'Real' Open
As advocates of OER, we strive to save our students money while remixing/collaborating to generate and use high quality materials licensed under Creative Commons. There remain, however, many educators that are intimidated and mystified by the concept of "open" even if they find the potential benefits appealing. Additionally, when asked if they use OER, many faculty will say "yes," even if there is quite a bit of confusion about what is and isn't actually "open." For example, many instructors link to web content or use materials located online without a second thought, usually presuming that "fair use" will cover their use. It might, of course, but with increased digital sharing the primacy of legal and ethical use of materials is clear.

In order to embed open remixing into institutional culture across a district, the Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction funded the development of an OER MOOC workshop designed to encourage faculty to get open by introducing them to the philosophy, efficacy, licensing, use, remixing, and sharing of open resources. For two years now, faculty across the Maricopa Community College District (and beyond) have benefited from this online workshop as well as any of several face-to-face seminars introducing them to the philosophical, legal, and practical applications of openness. With over a hundred participants throughout the district and across the world, the online workshop has proven to be a meaningful, open-ended resource for educators and administrators interested in learning the basics of OER.

This presentation will introduce participants to this customizable tool, which they may take with them and make their own in order to encourage faculty in their own institutions to embrace open resources.

Presenters
avatar for Matthew Bloom

Matthew Bloom

English Faculty, Scottsdale Community College


Friday November 20, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Boardroom

3:30pm

Motivating Faculty to Adopt Open
In today's world of higher education, everyone is being asked to do much more with much less. So when members of Northern Essex Community College's Textbook Task Force decided to launch a pilot Open Educational Resources initiative, we knew having faculty support was critical to its success. In this presentation, we will share with you our process for motivating faculty to get started with OER and the important role our early adopters played in the fast growth of the OER movement at NECC.

A brief overview of NECC's OER project will be shared, which outlines an initial investment of $5,000 and a projected first semester student savings of $52,000. In just 18 months, the project has grown into an $18,000 investment with a projected student savings of over $300,000 in four academic terms. The focus of the presentation will be on the faculty role in securing funding, motivating other faculty to get involved, creating partnerships and sharing resources. The mindset change that occurred in most cases will also be discussed because what started as a way to save students money has truly changed the way many of our faculty are teaching and more importantly, how are students our learning.

Presenters
avatar for Jody Carson

Jody Carson

Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education, Northern Essex Community College


Friday November 20, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Vancouver Island

3:30pm

K-12 OER Collaborative
This session will provide an update on the K-12 OER Collaborative. The K-12 OER Collaborative is an initiative led by a group of 12 states with the goal of creating comprehensive, high-quality, open educational resources (OER) supporting K-12 mathematics and English language arts that are aligned with state learning standards.

Presenters
avatar for Cable Green

Cable Green

Director of Open Education, Creative Commons
Cable is an "Open Education & Policy" guy. Cable works with the global open education community to leverage open licensing, OER, open policies, and open pedagogy to significantly improve access to quality, affordable, education and research resources so everyone in the world can attain all the education they desire.
avatar for Karl Nelson

Karl Nelson

Director, Digital Learning, WA OSPI
avatar for Jennifer Wolfe

Jennifer Wolfe

Partner, The Learning Accelerator


Friday November 20, 2015 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Waddington Room